Average: 4.7 (27 votes)

August 20, 1969

Schenectady, NY US

Aerodrome

Setlist:

included: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, You Shook Me, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown

Notes:

Two shows, 8pm & 11pm.

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book

Promoters paid Led Zeppelin $8,000 per appearance. "I remember Robert Plant smiling and saying, 'It's so nice to be in sunny Schenectady' recalls Jim Furlong, owner of Vestige Music Shop in Albany. "A year later, Zeppelin were filling Madison Square Garden."

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Comments

Submit your personal review of a particular show you attended, updates, corrections, etc., which will be considered for addition to the official online archive.You may also contact the webmaster at: webmaster@ledzeppelin.com

Profile of the Aerodrome

Marv Cermak's COVERING SCHENECTADY

Aerodrome memories still echo

First published: Tuesday, June 6, 2006

It''s been nearly 35 years since some of the nation's best-known names in music played at Schenectady's Aerodrome, but Frank Popolizio is repeatedly reminded about the place.
"Hardly a day goes by when somebody doesn't tell me they remember having a blast at the nightclub," Popolizio said. "Sometimes our crowds reached around 3,000."

Back then, I was a sports reporter hanging out with jocks at corner sports bars, listening to Frank Sinatra on jukeboxes and totally uninterested in hippie crowds/music.

While I don't remember the Aerodrome success, after Popolizio rattled off some performers' names, there was no reason to doubt his crowd estimates.

Janice Joplin, Billy Joel, Led Zeppelin, B.J. Thomas, Brooklyn Bridge, Vanilla Fudge and Three Dog Night were among marquee guest artists. The Aerodrome was located in the ex-Woodlawn Lanes, a 32-alley behemoth demolished long ago to make way for a shopping plaza.

"At some concerts the lines of fans stretched six, seven blocks. There was never a nightclub like this in the Capital Region," Popolizio recalled.

He, business partner Pat Ragozzino and a couple cousins were gofers, bartenders, bus boys, ID checkers and managers. "We did everything to make the place go,"said Popolizio, who went on to become one of Schenectady's biggest landlords.

Jack Rubin of Chicago was the money behind the operation. He ran the show from 1968 to 1972 when ill health put him out of business.

Because of the constant Aerodrome inquiries, Popolizio plans to create a Web site with many old photos. "I discovered an incredible bond between Aerodrome fans. I've been involved in many things, but that was the best period of my life."