Average: 4.8 (17 votes)

March 13, 1971

Bath, UK

Bath Pavillion

Setlist:

includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Since I've Been Loving You, Black Dog, Dazed and Confused, Stairway to Heaven, Going to California, That's the Way, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown.

Notes:

"Back to the clubs" tour.

Memorabilia:

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Comments

Submit your personal review of a particular show you attended, updates, corrections, etc., which will be considered for addition to the official online archive.You may also contact the webmaster at: webmaster@ledzeppelin.com

Bath Pavillion, 13 March 1971

Tickets were 50p. The Pavilion was an open, naked room usually used for roller skating or jumble sales. There were a few wooden benches against the wall and somebody dragged them into the centre of the room. I stood on one and waited, watching the curtained stage as the room filled up. It was cold and the condensation soon ran down the windows and glistened on the walls. There was no support band, just a couple of thumping, crashing drum beats before the curtains pulled open and in a red and golden glow Robert Plant ripped into Immigrant Song. That was the lead track off the most recent album and it just blew the roof off the place. It is now many years ago but I still can feel the power of that performance and touch the intimacy of the softer songs which also characterised that third album, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones sitting on either side of Robert Plant, playing acoustic and mandolin while he sang That's the Way and Going to California. Yes, that was off the next album which was not to be released for another eight months. And so was Black Dog, with the doubled-up four-bar introduction from Out On The Tiles and also, for the first time, Stairway to Heaven. But Plant got the words wrong, or at least did not sing them as they have become so well known. The show was essentially that which they recorded for the BBC on John Peel's Rock Hour a couple of weeks later and broadcast on 4 April. But if that was a studio show and a little contained, the one at the Bath Pavilion was raw and alive. The band were back in the West Country and, as Plant said, things seemed to go particularly well here. The chat which is expunged from the studio recording gave intimacy to the performance. Dazed and Confused was introduced teasingly as Days of Confusion, but it didn't matter; we knew what it was. Then Plant's harmonica failed him and he called angrily for another. And when he threw his tambourine out into the audience it was caught by an eager hand, so close it could have been a handshake. Standing on that bench for over two hours began to hurt, as did the volume in the ears, but by the next morning all that was left was the ringing, the tinnitus — that, and one of John Bonham's drumsticks which I still have, displayed on the wall beside me at I write this. I saw Led Zep seven times in all, but I did not manage to see them tonight, 10 December 2007. More's the pity.