Average: 4.7 (31 votes)

July 21, 1973

Providence, RI US

Civic Center (Providence)

Setlist:

Rock and Roll, Celebration Day, (Bring It On Home intro) Black Dog, Over the Hills and Far Away, Misty Mountain Hop, Since I've Been Loving You, No Quarter, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Dazed and Confused (incl. San Francisco), Stairway to Heaven, Moby Dick, Heartbreaker, Whole Lotta Love (Incl. Let That Boy Boogie), The Ocean.

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Comments

Submit your personal review of a particular show you attended, updates, corrections, etc., which will be considered for addition to the official online archive.You may also contact the webmaster at: webmaster@ledzeppelin.com

Reason "Over the Hills and Far Away" Was Pretermitted

Great review of an powerful yet uneven show. Let me just amplify your point about "Over the Hills and Far Away." I have heard an audience recording of the show that clearly reveals the reason this wayward rendition lacked focus and determination. Pagey cuts the song short before the final verse and lurches awkwardly into the fanfare coda because of misbehavior in the crowd. After the song is pretermitted, much to the band's dismay, Robert brings the proceedings to a halt and sternly warns the crowd that further horseplay will end the proceedings without further delay. However, Plant soon relents, and, in his genial and gentlemanly way, encourages the crowd to enjoy themselves while at the same time imploring them to listen.

The result is absolutely the highlight of the show, and one of the great moments of the tour: a stellar rendition of "Since I've Been Loving You." Scintillating. Page at his absolute best. This is in the league of the great "Tea for One." Same minor blues, same emotional intensity. Here, however, unlike live performances from later, more languid days, Jimmy's playing is both shockingly intense and stunningly precise. Not one stepped-on note to be heard. The tempo is perfect; Jimmy's phrasing is eloquently ensorcelling, spanning bar lines with wondrous ease; his use of rests is, well, arresting; his attack is razor-sharp; his tone is plangent and well-spoken; and his bends and tonal clusters are perfectly executed and gripping. Nonpareil. A classic.

The remainder of the show is enjoyable but not truly memorable.

Requiescat in pace John Henry Bonham (1948-1980).