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Macon Coliseum - April 3, 1970

  • Includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 9:21am
Rate this show: 
Average: 5 (59 votes)
April 3, 1970
Macon
GA
United States
us
Setlist: 

Includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.

Note: 

Robert Plant contributes to the middle jam mele of Whole Lotta Love on JPJ's Hammon organ.

------------------------------

Press Review: Zeppelin Concert – Macon Crowd Goes Wild

England’s Led Zeppelin washed its hands in muddy water Friday night as the citizens of Redding’s birthplace eloquently expressed their appreciation.

The group played with brilliance and endurance which far surpassed the performance it gave at last summer’s Atlanta Pop Festival. This was largely due to the Macon crowd’s enthusiasm, from which Led Zeppelin seemed to draw its own enthusiasm, even on this, its fifth North American tour.

As Page bowed his way noisily through Dazed & Confused, I feared that we were in for an evening of psychedelic delights in the tradition of Iron Butterbird.

Things came better though as the group introduced a song from its upcoming album, Led Zeppelin III, which is to be released incidentally sometime during the summer.

As Plant introduced it, bassist John Paul Jones took his station at the Hammond organ and along with Page, played the best stuff that has been done in Macon since the cops ran Duane Allman out.
Bonham shone on Moby Dick (always have gone for that song) and by the time Page and Jones returned to the stage to finish it, the crowd was going mad.

I never have gone for drum solos but Bonham really was outstanding. Anyway, what with Plant’s harp playing, by the end of Bring it On Home, the crowd was in hysterics and pushing the cops into the front of the stage.

With the crowd peaking, Jones started How Many More Times and we all wondered. The cops had given up and Page’s guitar was so loud you couldn’t hear anything else.

Plant pulled his “gun” bit superbly and the boogie went on and on. When they had finished, the crowd hadn’t and was screaming louder than ever. They reciprocated with a massive rendition of Whole Lotta Love, with Plant on organ.

Georgia has never seen the like.

(S.Fair , Staff Writer / April 1970)
 

Notes: 

Robert Plant contributes to the middle jam mele of Whole Lotta Love on JPJ's Hammon organ.

------------------------------

Press Review: Zeppelin Concert – Macon Crowd Goes Wild

England’s Led Zeppelin washed its hands in muddy water Friday night as the citizens of Redding’s birthplace eloquently expressed their appreciation.

The group played with brilliance and endurance which far surpassed the performance it gave at last summer’s Atlanta Pop Festival. This was largely due to the Macon crowd’s enthusiasm, from which Led Zeppelin seemed to draw its own enthusiasm, even on this, its fifth North American tour.

As Page bowed his way noisily through Dazed & Confused, I feared that we were in for an evening of psychedelic delights in the tradition of Iron Butterbird.

Things came better though as the group introduced a song from its upcoming album, Led Zeppelin III, which is to be released incidentally sometime during the summer.

As Plant introduced it, bassist John Paul Jones took his station at the Hammond organ and along with Page, played the best stuff that has been done in Macon since the cops ran Duane Allman out.
Bonham shone on Moby Dick (always have gone for that song) and by the time Page and Jones returned to the stage to finish it, the crowd was going mad.

I never have gone for drum solos but Bonham really was outstanding. Anyway, what with Plant’s harp playing, by the end of Bring it On Home, the crowd was in hysterics and pushing the cops into the front of the stage.

With the crowd peaking, Jones started How Many More Times and we all wondered. The cops had given up and Page’s guitar was so loud you couldn’t hear anything else.

Plant pulled his “gun” bit superbly and the boogie went on and on. When they had finished, the crowd hadn’t and was screaming louder than ever. They reciprocated with a massive rendition of Whole Lotta Love, with Plant on organ.

Georgia has never seen the like.

(S.Fair , Staff Writer / April 1970)
 

Setlists: 

Includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.

Comments

Glenn's picture

My parents dropped me & my little brother off and went to visit our aunt. I was 17 & he was 13th. Fantastic show, wildest music I'd ever heard. Actually my 3rd concert, Beach Boys in Daytona with a band Greg & Duane Allman were in openning in Daytona a yr or so earlier. Johnny Cash & company in Macon earlier and Blues Image openning for Iron Butterfly in Jacksonville the day the Manson murders were discovered. Zeplin was unbeliveable, a major rock concert show in my life, but the wildest part was, my mom & 8yr old sister came to the doors to pick us up when the show was suppose to end, but Led Zeplin was still playing and since it was cold the rent a cop security let them in and they saw the last 2 songs!

Janet 's picture

I was devastated over not being allowed to attend (was 13 with very overprotective parents). Even with the crappy acoustics in the Macon Coliseum at the time, I heard this was an incredible show. So sorry to have missed it. Does anyone remember who opened for this show? I've also often wondered if LZ ever crossed musical paths with our hometown ABB, and if JP ever jammed with the late, great Duane Allman. So sorry this was the one and only LZ visit to Macon.

Jim Farmer's picture

There was no opening act. The show was advertised as "An Evening with Led Zeppelin" and it was just that. The band played for close to three hours with at least one band member on stage performing at all times.
I saw most of the great acts of that era, but this was the most dynamic show I've ever seen to this day. They even made The Who look slow and inactive (and I Loved The Who). A group of us from the University of GA got together and carpooled to Macon.

Great night, great music!

jr's picture

I will admit that the night was a little fuzzy, but my recollection is that the opening act got stuck in route by bad weather and Zeppelin came on early and played their asses off for the whole concert. Jimmy Page did an extremely long solo with his violin bow and some new electronic gadget he was experimenting with. Even though the sound at the Coleseum was bad, they were so loud they completely overcame the poor acoustics.

As my friend Donna put it, they were "MUCH HELL"

David A.'s picture

This was my first concert and to see Led in Macon was unbelievable. It was a three hour show that changed my outlook on music. Highlights include, Jimmy's solo and Bonzo hard hitting playing. Absolutely awesome concert.

andy's picture

My oldest friend and I traveled from Gainesville Ga and spent the night in Macon in order to see LZ. How two 17 year old boys were able to persuade our conservative parents to let us go will never be known. Perhaps my Grandmother's comment sheds some light-"You boys enjoy the 'Led ZeppelinS', I'm sure it is a fine orchestra".

Gary's picture

On April 3, 1970, The ABB was on their way to play in Cincinatti, Ohio for two gigs at Ludlow's Garage on Sat. 4-4-70 and Sun. 4-5-70. The Allman Brothers Band opened and closed the Atlanta Pop Festival in Byron, GA. on Friday afternoon 7-3-70 and Sunday night 7-5-70 and I saw both shows as I was a contract roadie setting up for them at the festival. Unfortunately Led Zeppelin did not play at the 2nd Atlanta Pop Festival in July 1970 in Byron, GA. near Macon, even though they had played at the 1st Atlanta Pop Festival held at Atlanta International Raceway in July 1969, I saw that show as well. No one in Atlanta knew who Led Zeppelin was but we found out real quick. I remember the first song they played was "Communication Breakdown" and Page's guitar riffs caught my attention. In the summer of 1969, The ABB had just started gigging and building a name for themselves. The first time The ABB played in Atlanta, GA was on May 11-12-1969 at The Piedmont Park Arts Festival, where they had an immediate following of Georgia fans and the rest is history.

Chuck's picture

I am not sure if I remember this correct. I was unable to attend, I was about your age and also not allowed to go but I think I remember the opening act being Humble Pie. I won 2 free tickets off of WNEX am radio and I was told I couldn't go. I still have those tickets to this day.

http://www.myputerdr.com/index.html

Marty's picture

I drove down from Atlanta to see the concert. The group probably skipped Atlanta, which still only had a 5,000 seat concert hall, to play the Macon Coliseum, which seated almost twice as many people. The concert did not sell-out. If you have unused tickets they are worth many times their original face value. I don't remember there being any opening act. I certainly would have remembered if Humble Pie had opened. Hadn't Led Zeppelin ceased to have opening acts for their concerts by this time? The ad looks like the one that ran in The Great Speckled Bird (Atlanta's weekly underground newspaper). I do remember that it was a great concert. The group was really starting to strectch the length of the songs.

Billy's picture

Correct, no opening acts in 1970 US. LZ eliminated the need for any opening acts as they could handle the shows alone. And "An Evening With...." by definition should mean only one band on the bill.

Olin's picture

My first ever concert live.  My first time taking my Dad's Olds out of town and a few other firsts that evening as well!

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Comments

concert 70 by Olin (not verified)
Correct, no opening act. by Billy (not verified)
Macon Coliseum April 3, 1970 by Jim Farmer (not verified)
no opening act by Marty (not verified)
My oldest friend and I by andy (not verified)
Led Zeplin by Glenn (not verified)
I will admit that the night by jr (not verified)
I was devastated over not by Janet (not verified)
Macon by David A. (not verified)