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Yale Bowl - August 15, 1970

  • includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, Since I've Been Loving You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown (medley: incl. Good Times Bad Times).
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 10:40am
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.6 (54 votes)
August 15, 1970
New Haven
CT
United States
us
Setlist: 

includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, Since I've Been Loving You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown (medley: incl. Good Times Bad Times).

Note: 

Press Review: "Zeppelin Zap"

The parting gesture to the New Haven Jaycees’ 1970 P Series arrived in the form of Led Zeppelin, a rock quartet whose reputation is largely explosive as nitroglycerin. Handled badly, the group goes up in smoke; handled well, the group provides nerve shattering musical gymnastics that cry out to the heavens.

Saturday night’s performance was handled brilliantly by the stage crew and even the sound system behaved sharply (an augmented reverb system was the electronic high point of the evening).

But lest one think that Led Zeppelin is a sedate, socially acceptable group, he may perish the thought. Led Zeppelin is the very reincarnation of the apocalyptic bad trip. The trip begins the moment John Henry Bonham throws the beat into first and power shifts straight to some nirvana. John Paul Jones swings his bass into play, Jimmy Page dives his guitar and Robert Plant cascades like pebbles in a landslide all over the stage.

The standard Zeppelin carved-in-granite stuff mingled with some new, surprisingly enchanting material, “The Golden Breath” (aka “Bron-YR-Aur”), a poignant, haunting tune by Page. The segues through Zeppelin I and II were exactly what the capacity crowd wanted.
 
One of the memorable moments came when Plant and company exited; leaving John Bonham to his sticks and drums. And for nearly 10 minutes, his “Moby Dick” solo showed once and for all that nobody this side of maybe Ginger Baker can crumble another drummer’s ego the way Bonham can.

“Big Girls Don’t Cry”, (aka “That’s the Way”), another unusual song, utilized a simple mandolin which Jones handled like a symphonic virtuoso. That the Way, Immigrant Song (soon to be released on Zeppelin III) and that ever-charting Whole Lotta Love, snapped, crackled and boomed for nearly three solid hours. And when the convoy of black Caddy limousines appeared, the crowd grew restive, refusing to let the boys go away so easily.

The closing encore was met by standing ovation and a general run ensued onto the stage. Police and Jaycee security held the line, but the fans did get to run alongside the limousine as it sped out the side gate and into history.

And under the full August moon; with the dust lingering behind the empty bowl, the people were going home stoned on electric Kool-Aid running full tap from Led Zeppelin’s keg of true rock professionalism.

Chalk up the 1970 Jaycee Pop Series as “Right On!”  (P. Gionfriddo, New Haven Register, August 1970)

Notes: 

Press Review: "Zeppelin Zap"

The parting gesture to the New Haven Jaycees’ 1970 P Series arrived in the form of Led Zeppelin, a rock quartet whose reputation is largely explosive as nitroglycerin. Handled badly, the group goes up in smoke; handled well, the group provides nerve shattering musical gymnastics that cry out to the heavens.

Saturday night’s performance was handled brilliantly by the stage crew and even the sound system behaved sharply (an augmented reverb system was the electronic high point of the evening).

But lest one think that Led Zeppelin is a sedate, socially acceptable group, he may perish the thought. Led Zeppelin is the very reincarnation of the apocalyptic bad trip. The trip begins the moment John Henry Bonham throws the beat into first and power shifts straight to some nirvana. John Paul Jones swings his bass into play, Jimmy Page dives his guitar and Robert Plant cascades like pebbles in a landslide all over the stage.

The standard Zeppelin carved-in-granite stuff mingled with some new, surprisingly enchanting material, “The Golden Breath” (aka “Bron-YR-Aur”), a poignant, haunting tune by Page. The segues through Zeppelin I and II were exactly what the capacity crowd wanted.
 
One of the memorable moments came when Plant and company exited; leaving John Bonham to his sticks and drums. And for nearly 10 minutes, his “Moby Dick” solo showed once and for all that nobody this side of maybe Ginger Baker can crumble another drummer’s ego the way Bonham can.

“Big Girls Don’t Cry”, (aka “That’s the Way”), another unusual song, utilized a simple mandolin which Jones handled like a symphonic virtuoso. That the Way, Immigrant Song (soon to be released on Zeppelin III) and that ever-charting Whole Lotta Love, snapped, crackled and boomed for nearly three solid hours. And when the convoy of black Caddy limousines appeared, the crowd grew restive, refusing to let the boys go away so easily.

The closing encore was met by standing ovation and a general run ensued onto the stage. Police and Jaycee security held the line, but the fans did get to run alongside the limousine as it sped out the side gate and into history.

And under the full August moon; with the dust lingering behind the empty bowl, the people were going home stoned on electric Kool-Aid running full tap from Led Zeppelin’s keg of true rock professionalism.

Chalk up the 1970 Jaycee Pop Series as “Right On!”  (P. Gionfriddo, New Haven Register, August 1970)

Setlists: 

includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, Since I've Been Loving You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown (medley: incl. Good Times Bad Times).

Comments

Stevie Mac's picture

Still remember the big sound of the new "Immigrant Song" at the start of this concert. Nobody at that time really knew the significance of witnessing one of the premier rock acts of all time. Glad I could be there for about 5 bucks--Yeah, do you believe it? My guitar-playing son would have loved to have been there with me--but I guess he really was. At 60 years of age, I say--Rock on, Zep!

Michael's picture

I was only 16 years old but had been to couple of concerts. I was a little bummed out when they first appeared I think it was Robert Plant moaning about how he hated New Haven. I remember there being a bit of a to do over how loud they could set their amps. The Yale bowl is situated in a in a residential area and the organizers had assure the community that they would keep it at reasonable level what ever that is. Anyway the band didn't like it and they let the crowd know it. Hell, we just wanted to hear them play. Well when they did it was amazing, unbelievable and incredible. If they had a problem with New Haven it didn't show up in the music. And I can't imagine anyone giving a better performance than John Bonham, he was incredible anyone that went to that concert unless they were totaly fried would have remembered Bonham. His hands must have been bleeding when that concerted ended.

Lucius's picture

This is the only Led Zeppelin concert I've attended. I was 18.

What an unexpected delight to find the review from "The New Haven Register" featured. "Zeppelin Zap" What a frickin' goof! But he called it (P. Gionfriddo), and it was a trip down memory lane (back in the late Sixties, a high school budy of mine worked part-time at "The Register").

Much obliged to the Webmaster and to Led Zep for maintaining an A#1 site. Cheers.

Argenteum Astrum's picture

This is a monstrous show, with Robert's voice reaching unbelievable heights, as well as the band being unstoppable. Listen to Dazed And Confused and the Whole Lotta Love medley ... unreal stuff! Even Bonham's drum solo is thunderous and exciting.

Greg Cox's picture

This concert has always had a setlist that omits the JPJ Organ Solo and Thank You. My guess is was a monster version and the original taper kept the vintage version to himself. But there is no reason why they shouldn't have played Thank You at this venue, since it was the highlight of their concert, as Stairway would become to concerts in 1971 and thereafter.

Frank Baccki's picture

I was 11 yrs old I bought my sister a Led Zeppelin LP for here birthday when she opened it and played the LP I started to cry I thought it was the worse music I ever heard She said no Frankie this band is going to go a long way Well that summer she had bought tickets to go see Led Zeppelin at the Yale Bowl and took me with her I was only 11 and was blown away I had never heard a group play rock&roll like that the drummer was fuck en GREAT that hook me and never missed anything that Led Zeppelin did.In our life's we will never see or hear a band like the Zep again

dp's picture

This was the first rock concert I'd ever been to. Was 14. Remember visiting a friend in 69 and him putting on the first album. Blew my mind. Yale bowl was about two miles from where I grew up. Second record came out and the concert was announced. Got tickets.
They came on stage while still light. No opening act. Didn't recognize them. Plant had hair down to his belt and a pair of star painted boots. Jimmy had a beard. He picked up the guitar and they started 'The Immigrant Song."
Holy shit! My life changed. (not sure for the better but It's the only one I have) A most incredible experience.

mike's picture

nice weather,
zonked,
could not believe a band could sound that good,
loud enough,
they just played the songs, very little delay between songs,
don't remember plant complaining (or do i?),
i would really like to get the bootleg (rare short party?) please help
new haven was wierd about concerts at the bowl

Joe meyer's picture

I was at Re: above concert. FYI, James Gang (Joe Walsh) were the opening act.

Robert DeLeon's picture

I was very fortunate to have been at the Led Zeppelin performance on August 15, 1970 at the Yale Bowl in New Haven - and proceeded to put on one of the best rock shows I had ever witnessed. I was especially knocked out by "Heartbreaker" and "Moby Dick". This show is one of the most treasured memories of my youth - especially now being in my 50's and a grandfather. Both of my grown daughters (Zeppelin fans as well) are jealous that I was able to see them and they were not! If there is a reunion tour in the works, one way or another, I'll be there!

Valerie Ward's picture

Wasn't YES the opening act for that night?

Frank Baccki's picture

No .......No opening act

dp's picture

no opening act. 'Yes' opened for 'Grand Funk'. Grand Junk by then but can't blame em for tryin.

dp's picture

valerie

as I recall 44 yrs back - 'yes' opened for 'GFRailroad' that summer.

The summer series also had eric clapton (a horrible mess that night)

& lastly 'the greatful dead' where there was some outside disturbance and concerts @ the bowl have been unbookable since.

Scott's picture

I still remeber it well, no warm-up band and Plant belting out their opening song "The Immigrant Song." It was my first concert! What a way to start! Saw them 3 times after that. I still have the ticket stubs and the program from that memoriable evening. 

Billy's picture

Sorry, but LZ did not have opening acts on their 1970 North American Tours. They advertised the shows specifically as  "An Evening With..." and stated the "2 1/2 Hour" stage time (however accurate that actually was depends on the show). But the point is LZ could handle shows all alone by that point.

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Comments

no opening act. 'Yes' opened by dp (not verified)
43 YEARS AGO TONIGHT by Scott (not verified)
Led Zeppelin, Yale Bowl, Aug. 15, 1970 by Joe meyer (not verified)
Yale Bowl Concert Set List by Greg Cox (not verified)
Zeppelin at the Bowl by Stevie Mac (not verified)
No .......No opening act by Frank Baccki (not verified)
Best Concert I ever seen by Frank Baccki (not verified)
Zep concert by Valerie Ward (not verified)
impressions on the evening by mike (not verified)
new haven show by dp (not verified)
One of the Greatest Rock Shows Ever by Robert DeLeon (not verified)
Yale Bowl Concert 8/15/1970 by Michael (not verified)