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Convention Hall - August 16, 1969

  • Includes: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, White Summer ~ Black Mountain side, You Shook Me, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown.
srapallo's picture
on September 20, 2007 - 6:17pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.6 (47 votes)
August 16, 1969
Asbury Park
NJ
United States
us
Setlist: 

Includes: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, White Summer ~ Black Mountain side, You Shook Me, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown.

Note: 

Led Zeppelin play two shows (7:30pm & 10:00pm) with Joe Cocker support act, who travelled directly to the Woodstock festival after the gig. Peter Grant turned down the offer for Zep to perform at the 3-day event.

Press Review: The Blue Britons

ASBURY PARK - A good example - perhaps the best in one case - of a thing called British Blues was heard at Convention Hall Saturday night when Led Zeppelin and Joe Cocker shared a double bill.

The main attraction, Led Zeppelin, is a four-man unit headed by guitarist Jimmy Page. It features Robert Plant on lead vocals and harmonica and produces a kind of contemporary blues (Page's term)-hard rock blend of things written mainly by Page, John Paul Jones (the group's bassist, pianist, organist, and arranger) and John Bonham, its drummer.

Joe Cocker, on the other hand is mainly an interpreter of songs. He is about the best voice interpreting the blues today, and is rapidly gaining an audience of ardent followers in the US as well as England. His group – which looks as if it is still the Grease Band, a Sheffield group he’s been with for several years, is one of the most together groups playing today- The Who notwithstanding.

The two groups exemplify clearly the current blues trend – Zeppelin with its hard rock originality laced with blues and dominated by Page’s virtuosity on guitar, and the Cocker band, dominated by Cocker’s genuine feeling for the blues. Of the two, Cocker is best at his approach than anyone else who does what he does, except maybe Joplin who is his equal. Led Zeppelin, an interesting, hard-working quartet isn’t bad, but has a lot of groups ahead of it who are in the same bag.

Page, a slender 23-year-old who has worked a lot with Clapton, hunches over his guitar, all but disappearing into it behind a head of long, curly brown hair. He draws from the instrument’s wires and amplification system a carefully chosen network of sounds which touch upon the blues, flamenco, classical, hard and acid rock. He’s fast and intensely interested. He does fantastic things to that guitar, not the least interesting of which is bowing it. THAT is something to see. And hear. Really wild!

While the Page guitar consistently leads Led Zeppelin, despite the fact that its vocalist, Plant, provides a kind of thinly wailing blues coupled with melodramatic poses, gyrations, and flailing about, it is Joe Cocker who dominates his group, not Stainton’s powerful keyboard.

Joe Cocker is something to see. Lining him up with Zeppelin was an interesting idea and, while it probably wasn't planned, what the proximity does is present a picture of pseudo-blues and blues-where-it's really-at. Plant's vocals could not seem anything but "staged" when seen against Cocker's. And, ·while both men have diverting physical movements (Cocker’s being perhaps the most diverting, even grotesque at first), it is Cocker who is a blues man from the inside out and Plant who merely sings about the blues.
 
Among Zeppelin’s numbers were a rousing Dazed & Confused, which seemed to please the audience immensely and featured Plant on vocals and choreography and Page’s guitar; You Shook Me and a solo by Page which according to Plant, the group “still likes to call White Summer” and which demonstrated clearly Page’s technical mastery of the electric guitar and showed just as clearly his search for a style.

The audience at the last show, while happily attentive and receptive to Joe Cocker, seemed to be more followers of Led Zeppelin. That could mean they prefer the British foursome’s style more. It could mean they prefer the music more. Or, it could just mean they haven’t had a chance to digest Cocker yet. Let’s hope so. [J.Pikula, AsburyPress | August 18, 1969]
 

Notes: 

Led Zeppelin play two shows (7:30pm & 10:00pm) with Joe Cocker support act, who travelled directly to the Woodstock festival after the gig. Peter Grant turned down the offer for Zep to perform at the 3-day event.

Press Review: The Blue Britons

ASBURY PARK - A good example - perhaps the best in one case - of a thing called British Blues was heard at Convention Hall Saturday night when Led Zeppelin and Joe Cocker shared a double bill.

The main attraction, Led Zeppelin, is a four-man unit headed by guitarist Jimmy Page. It features Robert Plant on lead vocals and harmonica and produces a kind of contemporary blues (Page's term)-hard rock blend of things written mainly by Page, John Paul Jones (the group's bassist, pianist, organist, and arranger) and John Bonham, its drummer.

Joe Cocker, on the other hand is mainly an interpreter of songs. He is about the best voice interpreting the blues today, and is rapidly gaining an audience of ardent followers in the US as well as England. His group – which looks as if it is still the Grease Band, a Sheffield group he’s been with for several years, is one of the most together groups playing today- The Who notwithstanding.

The two groups exemplify clearly the current blues trend – Zeppelin with its hard rock originality laced with blues and dominated by Page’s virtuosity on guitar, and the Cocker band, dominated by Cocker’s genuine feeling for the blues. Of the two, Cocker is best at his approach than anyone else who does what he does, except maybe Joplin who is his equal. Led Zeppelin, an interesting, hard-working quartet isn’t bad, but has a lot of groups ahead of it who are in the same bag.

Page, a slender 23-year-old who has worked a lot with Clapton, hunches over his guitar, all but disappearing into it behind a head of long, curly brown hair. He draws from the instrument’s wires and amplification system a carefully chosen network of sounds which touch upon the blues, flamenco, classical, hard and acid rock. He’s fast and intensely interested. He does fantastic things to that guitar, not the least interesting of which is bowing it. THAT is something to see. And hear. Really wild!

While the Page guitar consistently leads Led Zeppelin, despite the fact that its vocalist, Plant, provides a kind of thinly wailing blues coupled with melodramatic poses, gyrations, and flailing about, it is Joe Cocker who dominates his group, not Stainton’s powerful keyboard.

Joe Cocker is something to see. Lining him up with Zeppelin was an interesting idea and, while it probably wasn't planned, what the proximity does is present a picture of pseudo-blues and blues-where-it's really-at. Plant's vocals could not seem anything but "staged" when seen against Cocker's. And, ·while both men have diverting physical movements (Cocker’s being perhaps the most diverting, even grotesque at first), it is Cocker who is a blues man from the inside out and Plant who merely sings about the blues.
 
Among Zeppelin’s numbers were a rousing Dazed & Confused, which seemed to please the audience immensely and featured Plant on vocals and choreography and Page’s guitar; You Shook Me and a solo by Page which according to Plant, the group “still likes to call White Summer” and which demonstrated clearly Page’s technical mastery of the electric guitar and showed just as clearly his search for a style.

The audience at the last show, while happily attentive and receptive to Joe Cocker, seemed to be more followers of Led Zeppelin. That could mean they prefer the British foursome’s style more. It could mean they prefer the music more. Or, it could just mean they haven’t had a chance to digest Cocker yet. Let’s hope so. [J.Pikula, AsburyPress | August 18, 1969]
 

Setlists: 

Includes: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, White Summer ~ Black Mountain side, You Shook Me, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown.

Comments

Beth R's picture

I was in the 2nd row I will never forget it it Was the best!!

Joanne's picture

I was 13 my parents dropped me and my 14 yr old cousin off at the show. Unfortunately I do not remember much of the show but it was the stepping stone for me and all future concerts.

Gene Brignola's picture

I remember that concert very clearly, Myslf and a group of friends were seated in the fist row of the Balcony and noticed that there were only about four steps from the floor to the stage.
Between the crowd and the stage were only about three security guards. I happen to look straigh down on the floor an watched a young girl started running up the right center isle heading for the stage. The band was just about to begin a new song as the girl cleared the un-observing guard, flew up the stair to the stage and put a football tackle on Jimmie Page. She just would not let go. It took a bit for security to get her off of him and escort her off the stage.

The band was incredible...
I saw the remnants of LED ZEPPLIN from back-stage at LIVE AID with Phil Collins on Drums.

GREAT MEMORIES

Paul's picture

saw the early show. I have black and white photos. several good ones. Cocker was excellent as was Zep seated in the 5th row center.

Ron's picture

I was just 17 when I saw Zep at Asbury Park convention hall. Best concert ever.

Francis "NAVYBLUE" Cywinski's picture

This particular Led Zeppelin concert was one of the first concerts I ever attended as a high school student. The North Jersey Coast Train was only about a twenty minute walk. The walk was supplemented with nice buzz from joint and alcolhol purchased when the train made a change from electric to diesel locomotive at South Amboy, NJ trainstation. I always liked the convention hall for a show. It seemed like the band was on top of you. Asbury Park Convention Center reminds me of famous English Dance Hall that is in England done in songs by The Who and The Kinks. I always liked the banana custard on the boardwalk and brought a bag of salt water taffy into the show.

sharon's picture

My brother went with my best friend and I went with my brother's best friend. My brother remembers the little red cowboy hat one of the band members wore. I remember Joe Cocker, he sang wonderfully, but moved so oddly!
Would you be able to forward me any of the pictures you have? My brother would love it!

Paul's picture

Does anyone remember the setlist for Joe cocker and the grease band, the opening act for the show?
Paul

Paul's picture

Hi;
I just realized that you answered my posting of having seen Led Zeppelin at Convention Hall in August of 69. Jimmy Paige is wearing the hat. I would be more than happy to send you the pictures of the concert. What would be the best way. Paul

lee speiser's picture

My brother just told me you posted the black and white pics you had. Thanks so much! My 20 year old son is so impressed! BTW just saw clapton and Wynwood in concert the other night. We took both our sons - one is a drummer, the other a guitar player. THey were blown away.

Bob's picture

I went to this concert instead of going to Woodstock...We decided that the traffic jam in NY State was not for us...Just had a good time in Asbury Park NJ

Name's picture

 I was sitting behind Bruce Springsteen and Little Steve and they were amaazed by the lead guitarist of Joe Cocker. They stood up and studied his performance as if they were analyzing the guitarist as they played A Little Help From Me Friends.

Jimmy was my favorite guitarist since then. When I saw him play his guitar with a bow I was spellbound.

Jacquie's picture

I was from Miami and visiting relatives in NYC who decided we should visit other relatives that had a small hotel in Asbury Park, for the weekend.  when we got there, I saw that LZ were playing on the Boardwalk and begged them to let me go.  they said yes, but only if you take your younger cousin (she was 12!) who knew the area.  it was no place for a kid, but I said okay and it turned out to be one of the most memorable shows of my life!

Bob's picture

Went to this show instead of Woodstock...Big traffic jam...

Michael AARON's picture

I was staying in Bradley Beach near Asbury Park on holiday with my mother. I was 13 at the time. She knew the promotor, Moe Septee. She drove me over to the concert hall that evening. That evening  was mind blowing for me, starting off by seeing Joe Cocker, and then leading into Zep doing there thing. I remember still vividly seeing Jimmy playing guitar on his back. That was the start of many great Zep shows over the years.

Name's picture

Joe Cocker opened for Led Zeppelin and it was one of the best concerts ever seen. We were sitting about 10 rows back in the center and Bruce Springsteen sat in front of us. He was checking the performaces of Joe Cocker and Led Zeppelin with Little Steven . They were truely impresse by the guitar in a Little Help from My Friends. They then just as I was so sblown away when Jimmy Page took out his bow and started playing. By the time the concert ended I was on my way to Woodstock.

Name's picture

August 16th 2014 Asbury Park NJ Convention Hall posted the Led Zeppelin August 16th 1969 concert on their marquis.

 

JM's picture

Led Zeppelin turned down Woodstock for Asbury Park

Jean Mikle, | August 23, 2014

 

It was Saturday Aug. 16, 1969, and at Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, New York, hundreds of thousands of people clustered on a mud-covered field for Day Two of the Woodstock Music & Art Fair.

 

The lineup that day included some of the biggest bands in the land: Canned Heat, Mountain, Sly and the Family Stone, Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Grateful Dead and The Who all played, although heavy rain and lengthy delays meant that several of the performers finished their sets in the wee hours on Sunday morning.

 

This is a story, though, about a band that wasn’t there.

 

Recruited to play at Woodstock, Led Zeppelin turned down the gig. Instead, they headlined a show about 150 miles south of Bethel, at Asbury Park’s Convention Hall, as part of promoter Moe Septee’s “Summer of Stars” concert series.

 

Zeppelin’s manager, Peter Grant, apparently turned down Woodstock because he didn’t want his band to be part of a multi-act bill.

In a 2010 interview on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” Zeppelin’s lead singer Robert Plant said, “Our management thought we would be typecast,” explaining that the festival was so visible that the fear was the guys’ performance would forever be linked to that particular event. Of course, in fairness, what a cultural touchstone Woodstock would become.”

In the summer of 1969, Zeppelin was a band on the rise. Its self-titled first album, released in January of that year, reached Number 10 on the Billboard charts in the U.S., and peaked at Number 6 in the U.K. The band’s pairing of blues, folk and psychedelia eventually would make it the biggest band of the 1970s, “as influential in that decade as The Beatles were in the previous one,” according to their biography on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame site.

 

Zeppelin would play more than 40 gigs on their Summer of 69 tour of U.S. At Convention Hall, they did two shows — at 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. — as was typical of bands who played Septee’s summer concert series. Tickets were $5.50 and $4.50, and $2.50 for standing room. The opener in Asbury: a young British blues-rocker named Joe Cocker.

 

Glen Partusch was only 12 years old in 1969, but he already was working at Convention Hall, hawking programs during the shows. Before the concerts, Partusch’s job was to number the seats that were placed on the floor of the hall before each show.

 

“We had the little stickers and we had to number each of them,” said Partusch, 57, who lives in Monmouth Beach.

 

He remembers that the 7:30 p.m. Zeppelin show was not sold out. “You could just walk up to the door and buy a ticket for $5.50,” he said, but the second one was “pretty much a sell-out.”

After seeing Zeppelin play, Partusch got its debut album the next day, although he didn’t buy it in a store. Instead, he won it at a boardwalk stall on Asbury’s boardwalk.

But it was Joe Cocker, backed by the Grease Band, and not Led Zeppelin, who stole the show in Partusch’s eyes.

 

“They were wild,” he remembered. “Seeing him perform, with the songs and the hand gestures, you couldn’t take your eyes off him. After the first show, I couldn’t wait for the second show to see it again.”

 

Asbury Park Press music writer Joan Pikula also seemed to like Joe Cocker just a bit more.

 

In her review of the show, which ran in the Aug. 18, 1969 edition of the Press, Pikula wrote, “Joe Cocker is something to see. Lining him up with Zeppelin was an interesting idea and while it probably wasn’t planned, what the proximity does is present a picture of pseudo-blues and blues-where-it’s-really-at. Plant’s vocals could not seem anything but “staged” when seen against Cocker’s ... it is Cocker who is a blues man from the inside out and Plant who merely sings the blues.”

 

Joe Cocker did make it to Woodstock. He and the Grease Band headed to Bethel after the Asbury show. Cocker would play at 2 p.m. Aug. 17 at Woodstock, and his powerful, soulful performance would propel him to stardom.

 

For Deal resident Pam DeLisa, Led Zeppelin was definitely the draw.

 

Sixteen years old that summer, DeLisa already was a huge Zeppelin fan. At the second show on Aug. 16, she had standing-room-only tickets, but managed to work her way right up to the stage by the end of the concert. Even better, she received a kiss from a T-shirt clad, super sexy Robert Plant, with his long mane of golden hair.

 

But it was not until 45 years later that DeLisa realized that the night had been even more special than she remembered. For decades, she had kept her ticket stub along with two items she had taken from the stage that night at show’s end: a paper cup that had once been filled with whiskey for the band, and a cigarette.

 

About a week ago she pulled out the ticket stub and was surprised to see some writing on the back. At first, she was annoyed.

 

“I couldn’t believe someone had scribbled on the back of the ticket,” DeLisa said. Then she looked closer. The scribbling turned out to the signatures of Plant and Led Zeppelin’s lead guitarist, Jimmy Page. “Love to Pam,” they had written.

 

“I couldn’t believe it,” DeLisa said. “I must have been so excited about getting kissed by Robert Plant that I forgot that I had gotten the autographs.”

 

It may not have been Woodstock, but Aug. 16, 1969, was certainly a night to remember on the Jersey Shore.

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Comments

I was at the early show by Michael AARON (not verified)
Where is Woodstock??? by Bob (not verified)
This concert instead of Woodstock by Bob (not verified)
I was there too! by Jacquie (not verified)
Joe cocker by Paul (not verified)
Led Zep by Ron (not verified)
I attended this show by Joanne (not verified)
black and white photos by lee speiser (not verified)
Led Zeppelin by Paul (not verified)
I was there too! by sharon (not verified)
saw the early show. I have by Paul (not verified)
Was there!! by Beth R (not verified)
Asbury Park by Francis "NAVYBL... (not verified)