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Casino Ballroom - August 27, 1969

  • Setlists during this period include: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, You Shook Me, White Summer / Black Mountain side, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown
srapallo's picture
on September 20, 2007 - 7:44pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.4 (20 votes)
August 27, 1969
Hampton Beach
NH
United States
us
Setlist: 

Setlists during this period include: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, You Shook Me, White Summer / Black Mountain side, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown

Note: 

Two performances: 8pm & 10pm

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book
Notes: 

Two performances: 8pm & 10pm

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book
Setlists: 

Setlists during this period include: Train Kept a Rollin', I Can't Quit You Baby, Dazed and Confused, You Shook Me, White Summer / Black Mountain side, How Many More Times, Communication Breakdown

Comments

Barry's picture

Stood in line around the block for tickets... guy in front of me looked liked wally cox with long hair and he kept talking about keefe hash.. Concert was great although I was in the back standing on window sill... Plants mike went out when he was swinging it around and he got pissed. Page was great on dazed and confused with his bow string... good night for sure!

fjeffery's picture

I dont remember whether there were two shows or one but do remember the long line and the short set. They were great, it was packed but left feeling they hadnt played long enough.

Don's picture

I attended the first show. It was good but too short, maybe 30 min.

Marge's picture

I was at this concert - still my favorite band

Brian's picture

I've heard from multiple sources that the show was short (approx. 4 songs/30 minutes) however I have not been able to confirm that there were in fact two shows. Everyone I speak to seems to only recount one, short set. One person thought this was due to a broken drum head on bonzo's kit. Can anyone confirm?

I'm looking to get in contact with anyone who was at this show and any other Casino Ballroom show between 1965-1971. Please e mail livemusicarchivist@yahoo.com

Thank you.

JS's picture

Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom creates ‘Hall of Fame’

The Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom has quite a story to tell.

As part of an effort to rebrand itself and promote its history, the popular seaside music venue is now sharing its story through 13 banners that hang on the walls.

The banners were tacked up in April and each carries the name of a famous artist who entertained at the ballroom and helped transform it into a destination for big names like U2, Led Zeppelin and the late George Carlin, who holds the record for the most sellout shows during his 30 years of performing at the beach.

It’s the Ballroom’s version of a “Hall of Fame,” featuring shows that represented a significant period of change or growth over an 85-year period leading up to the year 2000.

“Some people are blown away by bands that played here,” said Andrew Herrick, the ballroom’s marketing director.

The banners are just one piece of the ballroom’s plan to create a new look and feel for the estimated 125,000 people who come through the doors of the venue each year.

They don’t necessarily highlight the best shows that have taken place there because music is subjective, Herrick said. Instead, they highlight shows that shaped the ballroom’s history, beginning with Duke Ellington, whose performance in 1936 represents the big band era and the first time a national touring act came to the area, he said.

With so many talented performers gracing the ballroom’s stage over the years, deciding on which acts to include on the banners was tough. It was even more difficult because the ballroom wanted to make sure that each banner had a specific date for the performance. Jimi Hendrix and The Who performed at the ballroom, but because their exact dates couldn’t be nailed down, they weren’t included.

“We wanted to make sure we had the dates so it was authentic,” Herrick said.

Ellington’s banner is followed by one for Louis Armstrong, who was reprimanded by then-ballroom owner John Dineen after the jazz singer removed his jacket during a performance in 1941.

Dineen made Armstrong put the jacket back on for the show, which also came at a time when “check dancing” was growing in popularity.

The arrival of Simon & Garfunkel in 1966 introduced the ballroom to rock.

“What really turned this room around was the foray into rock,” Herrick said.

While they represented a period of soft rock, Simon & Garfunkel paved the way for future rock bands like The Doors, who performed in 1967. Janis Joplin earned her banner on the ballroom wall for her performance in July 1969, which came just one month before she played at Woodstock. Herrick described Joplin as an act that was “more of the, ‘You never know what you’re going to see here.’” Led Zeppelin played the first of two shows at the ballroom a month after Joplin and defined the real rock era at the venue.

“Led Zeppelin sort of represents what this room is. Rock bands love it,” Herrick said.

Another banner features Jethro Tull, whose performance was historic in many ways and was described as a turning point for the ballroom. The show held on July 12, 1971, was booked just before the band’s album “Aqualung” took off and became a huge success. So when the band arrived in Hampton, fans began rioting as they tried to get into the ballroom. The riot prompted the National Guard to be called in and the ballroom was shut down for three years. The ballroom later reopened with comedian George Carlin, who left his mark on the ballroom over three decades.

“He represented this growth in comedy that nobody had ever thought about,” Herrick said.

“Every show we ever did with George Carlin was almost sold out.”

By 1981, U2 had made its way to the ballroom, representing the arrival of the biggest touring band in the world. Herrick said tickets to U2’s show cost just $6.25.

Following in the footsteps of Carlin, stand-up comic Jerry Seinfeld appeared at the ballroom in 1988 just before he signed his deal with NBC and became a household name with the success of the TV sitcom “Seinfeld.”

The band Phish, which came to the ballroom in 1991, also has a spot on the wall because it changed the scope of independent music.

But the show that grabbed the most attention nationally, and the one that is considered the most emotional in the ballroom’s history, was Bob Weir & RatDog on Aug. 9, 1995.

The performance by Weir, the former rhythm guitarist for the Grateful Dead, came on the same day of Jerry Garcia’s death. Media and deadheads from across the country descended on the ballroom for the show, which quickly sold out.

“The music was healing and powerful,” Herrick said.

The final banner on the wall is dedicated to Godsmack’s show in 1999. The band from Massachusetts was chosen because it represents a local band that made it big nationally, and it was the first time that the ballroom tried selling tickets online.

The ballroom hopes to add more banners to the walls in the future as its story continues.

“We’re looking at doing this for a really long time,” Herrick said.

JASON SCHREIBER
Union Leader Correspondent

neil's picture

I was there, right up front. Don't remember a thing.

George's picture

I still have my tickets to this show! Can we go back? lol

George Kassapis's picture

I still have my tickets for the second show and never got to see them.

Tom Skusevich's picture

I was 17 years young from Lawrence, MA  and had purchased Led Zeppelin I in February of 1969 at Stuart's Dept. Store on Essex Street for the exorbitant price of $2.39. To this day Page and his bow on Dazed & Confused transformed me. It sounded like a jet plane flying in the Casino and he was this musical alchemist creating these sonic lines. Show stopper was How Many More Times - a great, original show and the birth of "heavy" blues rock.

Marcia's picture

Led Zep, casino ballroom aug 27 1969 was my and my husbands first date !

DWC's picture

I was camping up in Bethel Maine with my family, age 15.  Just sorta hitchhiked down the coast with a couple of townies.  I was pretty fried (red devil) so it was a blurr.  Dont even know how I got tickets, had no money!  The concert is still as clear as day in my head.  I was up front somehow in front of Paige. I rermember all of led zep 1 being played then 2.  seemed like over 3 hours but maybe I saw both shows?  when Paige started using the bow I was amazed.  He jammed for a loooooong time.  They stretched out lemon song and just nailed it. Plants voice was strong and clear even at the highest notes.  Unreal! After the show I saw my sister who was there but neither of us knew it!  Then a few days later I was back in Bethel but dont know how I got home.  I didnt get my ass beat.  My dad and mom were cool about it.  I became a confirmed heavy rock head that night for life. That was the 60's.!!

tomb's picture

I found a ticket for the show on the side walk. Not only did I see the show, it was the night of my first LSD journey. Pretty wild time I think.

 

 

 

Buzz's picture

I lived on Boar's Head, half mile up the road from the Casino.  Walked to the beach to see Zeppelin there. I was also at the Jimi Hendrix show at Maple Leaf Gardens in May on a trip with my mom.  Those 4 months spoiled me for any other concerts...

 

Mark Menery's picture

I was fortunate enough to be there for 2nd show.  Dick Zannini and I were perfectly in place as line finished entereing for 1st show.  In a a whisk, we found ourselves the 3rd and 4th persons inside the ropes for 2nd show.  After about an 1 1/2 hr wait, they open doors and bedlam ensued, we ran our way up the stairs and to the front row, for what was to be the most amazing night of my very, very young life!  (I was 15 yrs & 4 months).  The place rocked like I've never seen it rock to this day, and I saw them all in that Hall.  That night has stayed with me all 46 years.  I reminisce from time to time and go back in my head to that August night- it still seems surreal.  Led Zeppelin!  The best ever!

Breen's picture

Just recently back from attending Woodstock, myself and three friends from Boylston, Ma. went to see Zeppelin and don't remember a lot about it other than it was a short concert and the band didn't appear to be too happy about being there. Don't know what the issue was but at least I saw them live.

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Memorabilia:

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Comments

Hampto Beach Casino 8/69 by Breen (not verified)
I was fortunate enough to be by Mark Menery (not verified)
My 2nd concert by Buzz (not verified)
hampton beach by tomb (not verified)
Aug 27 1969 by Marcia (not verified)
Zep at Hampton Beach by Tom Skusevich (not verified)
casino show by fjeffery (not verified)
I still have my tickets for by George Kassapis (not verified)
I was at this concert - by Marge (not verified)
Casino Zepplin by Barry (not verified)
I attended the first show. by Don (not verified)
I was there, right up front. by neil (not verified)