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Marquee - December 10, 1968

  • Setlists during these early tours include: Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, You Shook Me, Dazed & Confused,  Babe I'm Gonna Leave You and How Many More Times.
srapallo's picture
on September 20, 2007 - 1:24pm
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Average: 2.8 (53 votes)
December 10, 1968
London
United Kingdom
uk
Setlist: 

Setlists during these early tours include: Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, You Shook Me, Dazed & Confused,  Babe I'm Gonna Leave You and How Many More Times.

Note: 

Review: Led Zeppelin, the re-grouped Yardbirds, made their Marquee debut last week. They are now very much a heavy music group, with singer Robert Plant leading and ably holding his own against a powerful backing trio of John Paul Jones (bass), John Bonham (drums), and Jimmy Page (guitar).

Amp troubles didn’t help them on this particular occasion but there seemed to be a tendency for too much volume which inevitably defeats musical definition.

One of the best numbers of the set was “Days of Confusion” (aka Dazed and Confused), featuring interesting inter-play of Plant’s voice and Page’s guitar on which he used a violin bow creating an unusual effect. Drummer Bonham is forceful, perhaps too much so, and generally there appears to be a need for Led Zeppelin to cut down on volume a bit. (T. Wilson, Oct’ 68)

Notes: 

Review (1): Led Zeppelin, the re-grouped Yardbirds, made their Marquee debut last week. They are now very much a heavy music group, with singer Robert Plant leading and ably holding his own against a powerful backing trio of John Paul Jones (bass), John Bonham (drums), and Jimmy Page (guitar).

Amp troubles didn’t help them on this particular occasion but there seemed to be a tendency for too much volume which inevitably defeats musical definition.

One of the best numbers of the set was “Days of Confusion” (aka Dazed and Confused), featuring interesting inter-play of Plant’s voice and Page’s guitar on which he used a violin bow creating an unusual effect. Drummer Bonham is forceful, perhaps too much so, and generally there appears to be a need for Led Zeppelin to cut down on volume a bit. (T. Wilson, Melody Maker, Dec. 1968)


Press Review (2): Led Zeppelin may sound a pretty incongruous sort of name to Americans unfamiliar with the British sense of humor, but when Who drummer Keith Moon dreamed up the title for Jimmy Page’s new group he was recalling an ancient British saying. They say that when a joke falls flat, it “goes down like a lead Zeppelin” (named after the World War I airship), but Page’s new combo seems in little danger of flopping.

For their recent appearance at London’s Marquee Club, the ex-Yardbirds guitarist whipped his men into a commendable frenzy which was not without its moments of inspiration and extensive improvisation.

“Our music sort of resembles jazz, as far as the improvisation is concerned,” explained the leader. “All I can say is that we’re just sort of moving on and throwing ideas to each other.
“We usually have the beginning part worked out in advance and the ending, and we might have a couple of cues as to what the thing is going to go into, but we might go off into anything—who knows? We do have some numbers that are more or less the same from beginning to end but they’re mostly the shorter ones, and anyway, it’s more of a challenge to experiment.”

I thought they had a tendency to go on for too long and destroy effective climaxes by trying to top them with a further musical climax. Jimmy took this criticism kindly. “It’s funny you should say that, because when we played here at the Roundhouse, the reaction was so good that I asked people what they thought of the group. Nearly everyone I spoke to said ‘oh, it was great, but you could have done longer!’ It seems to be the scene now.”

His most impressive feat on the night I caught the group, was bowing his guitar strings in harmony with the vocal on a number called ‘Days of Confusion.’ (Dazed & Confused) Surprisingly, I discovered that he first tried out this feat more than three years ago. “With the voice we try to do a lot of answering phrases and so on and that usually builds up into quite a thing with the voice following behind,” Jimmy explained. [Valerie Wilmer,  12/68]

Setlists: 

Setlists during these early tours include: Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, You Shook Me, Dazed & Confused,  Babe I'm Gonna Leave You and How Many More Times.

Comments

Martin Alston's picture

"I was at Led Zeppelin's first gig in London at The Marquee in 1968.

I was a 16 year old major Cream fan, and grieving over their recent demise. I had read an article by music critic Tony Palmer in the Observer newspaper, praising Led Zeppelin, and describing them as "the new Cream". So I just had to go and see them!
No booking of tickets etc., we just turned up and had to wait ages in a long queue which went all the way down Wardour St., and round into St. Annes Court. I recall  joining the queue by a telephone box opposite "The Macabre Club".
I can't remember how long it took to get in but of course it was well worth it.
I couldn't see very much over the heads of he crowd, but do in particular remember seeing the violin bow of Jimmy Page during 'Dazed  and Confused'.... And of course the volume!

We all thought we were witnessing something a bit special, certainly very different. Although not the expected "new Cream" my mates and I came out buzzing with excitement! I seem to recall that it was a bit later that the first album came out, and then we really realised what they could do. The rest as they say "is history".

Memorabilia:

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Comments

Led Zeppelin Marquee Club 10 December 1968 by Martin Alston (not verified)