Average: 4.9 (164 votes)

February 28, 1975

Baton Rouge, LA US

LSU Assembly Center

Setlist:

Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, Dazed and Confused (incl. Woodstock), Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Black Dog.

Notes:

'75 North American Tour Programme

Click here to view the North American '75 Tour Programme (flipbook)

Press Review: Metallic Sounds Highlight Led Zeppelin's LSU Concert

Rock 'n' roll's heaviest metal magicians, Led Zeppelin, blended their past and present for a multi-sensational experience at last night's LSU Assembly Center concert.

As lead singer Robert Plant told a packed audience early in the concert, it's "a cross-section of musical color we've managed to get together in the last six years . . . so hang on to your heads."

"Hang on to your heads "was good advice as lead guitarist Jimmy Page sent wave after wave of hundred-decibel metallic sounds surging through a huge bank of amplifiers.

With his guitar at crotch level and chest arched ceiling ward, Page seemingly has no bones — his body flows just as the music he orchestrates does.
The three-hour concert, unmarred by intermissions and boring backup bands, predictably climaxed with the classic "Stairway to Heaven."

The tall, wild-haired Plant stood spotlighted in gold as he temporarily tamed his screaming vocal cords to lead softly into the 1971 hit that remains their most requested song.

But the tempo and intensity of "Stairway to Heaven" quickly climbed to a crescendo, only to soften, then build, then soften again.
The concert itself was alternately but continually hard and soft, punctuated by smoke and swirling light.

All of the group's six albums, including the recently released "Physical Graffiti," were touched upon. Led Zeppelin blended many of their songs together in long, somewhat new interpretations. "Over the Hills and Far Away" became "Misty Mountain Hop" and then "Over the Hills" again. "Dazed and Confused" drifted into a surprise rendering of "Woodstock."

Bassist John Paul Jones was featured on the piano and organ in "No Quarter" amid rising blue and green smoke and swirling specks of green, yellow and red light.

And drummer John Henry Bonham had the stage to himself for an extended (perhaps a little too long) drum solo of "Moby Dick."
But throughout most of the show, it is Page and Plant who are front and center, setting the tempo, pace and mood.

The Led Zeppelin show is a draining experience for both performers and audience. The pulsating, twanging, metallic rhythms, coupled with bursts of light and smoke, marked by screaming heights one minute, temporarily gentled tones the next, is an odyssey in itself. [By C. WEATHERSBY]

Submit your personal review of a particular show you attended, updates, corrections, etc., which will be considered for addition to the official online archive.



You may also contact the webmaster at: webmaster@ledzeppelin.com