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Kinetic Playground - February 7, 1969

  • Second set includes: White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, You Shook Me (w/ JPJ on organ), As Long As I Have You (incl. Fresh Garbage, For What It's Worth), Dazed and Confused.
srapallo's picture
on September 20, 2007 - 2:56pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.9 (81 votes)
February 7, 1969
Chicago
IL
United States
us
Setlist: 

Second set includes: White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, You Shook Me (w/ JPJ on organ), As Long As I Have You (incl. Fresh Garbage, For What It's Worth), Dazed and Confused.

Note: 

Led Zeppelin share the bill with Vanilla Fudge and Jethro Tull for 2 nights in Chicago.


Review excerpt: Making their Chicago debut were Led Zeppelin, the new supergroup a la Cream and Jeff Beck Group, led by former Yardbird guitarist Jimmy Page.

On stage, the group’s act is a balanced blend of unaffected musicianship  - particularly Page – and strong physical presence – particularly vocalist Robert Plant.

Zeppelin’s portion of the show started a little slowly, with Jimmy sitting down and soloing on White Summer, from the old Yardbird days. I worried a bit, as he had said just before that they would mostly solo and improvise the second set and he wished I could have been there for the first.

Then came Babe I’m Gonna Leave You, the group’s arrangement of the traditional folk song which is my favorite cut from the new Atlantic album.  All doubts vanished.

Plant is a superb stylist, but that doesn’t keep him from enjoying himself at the same time. He peppered his deliveries with lines and phrases from other songs. Underground radio announcer, Psyche and I played a game to see who could identify the most songs. I caught the beginning of Buffalo Springfield’s For What It’s Worth during Fresh Garbage, as well as the end of Summertime and picked up on By The Time I Get to Phoenix in Babe.

But she won by spotting, of all things, Green Door in the middle of the encore, Dazed and Confused.

The encore came when the audience – and almost the whole wall-to-wall crowd stayed around after the Vanilla Fudge to see Zeppelin and the other group, Jethro Tull and absolutely refused to let the four go. They were halfway up the backstage stairs when the cheers brought them back.

The added number was another showstopper. Page bowed his guitar and the sound is incredible in its eeriness, during the number and his interplay with Plant was at its best. The two stood facing each other, throwing the musical ball back and forth, nodding in time with each beat.

It would have been enough. Even without John Paul Jones, a bassist who can hold his own with any in the business (a triumph on one solo sneaked on Mark Stein’s organ), or John Bonham on drums.  (ChicagoTrib., February  1969)

 

Notes: 

Led Zeppelin share the bill with Vanilla Fudge and Jethro Tull for 2 nights in Chicago.


Review excerpt: Making their Chicago debut were Led Zeppelin, the new supergroup a la Cream and Jeff Beck Group, led by former Yardbird guitarist Jimmy Page.

On stage, the group’s act is a balanced blend of unaffected musicianship  - particularly Page – and strong physical presence – particularly vocalist Robert Plant.

Zeppelin’s portion of the show started a little slowly, with Jimmy sitting down and soloing on White Summer, from the old Yardbird days. I worried a bit, as he had said just before that they would mostly solo and improvise the second set and he wished I could have been there for the first.

Then came Babe I’m Gonna Leave You, the group’s arrangement of the traditional folk song which is my favorite cut from the new Atlantic album.  All doubts vanished.

Plant is a superb stylist, but that doesn’t keep him from enjoying himself at the same time. He peppered his deliveries with lines and phrases from other songs. Underground radio announcer, Psyche and I played a game to see who could identify the most songs. I caught the beginning of Buffalo Springfield’s For What It’s Worth during Fresh Garbage, as well as the end of Summertime and picked up on By The Time I Get to Phoenix in Babe.

But she won by spotting, of all things, Green Door in the middle of the encore, Dazed and Confused.

The encore came when the audience – and almost the whole wall-to-wall crowd stayed around after the Vanilla Fudge to see Zeppelin and the other group, Jethro Tull and absolutely refused to let the four go. They were halfway up the backstage stairs when the cheers brought them back.

The added number was another showstopper. Page bowed his guitar and the sound is incredible in its eeriness, during the number and his interplay with Plant was at its best. The two stood facing each other, throwing the musical ball back and forth, nodding in time with each beat.

It would have been enough. Even without John Paul Jones, a bassist who can hold his own with any in the business (a triumph on one solo sneaked on Mark Stein’s organ), or John Bonham on drums.  (ChicagoTrib., February  1969)

 

Setlists: 

Second set includes: White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, You Shook Me (w/ JPJ on organ), As Long As I Have You (incl. Fresh Garbage, For What It's Worth), Dazed and Confused.

Comments

Mike McCurdy's picture

I was at this show, 1st set, one of my 1st concerts - I was 17. $5 :)

We had heard the 1st Zeppelin album so were familiar with them (I'll never forget hearing those opening chords on Good Times Bad Times for the 1st time - had never heard anything like it) but Jethro Tull (had never heard of), who led off, was a real pleasant surprise - that early incarnation of them was my favorite - they were jazz, blues, and rock combined in a way I'd never heard before; rushed out and bought their 1st album the next day - loved their drummer and guitarist.

Led Zeppelin I remember as being great of course - we were sitting (no chairs as was the custom at the Playground and Aragon) very close to the stage and not far from the right speakers - it was loud and Page was playing. What else can I say? It was nice seeing them before they became 'rock stars' with all the posing/posturing crap. The Music was the thing back then.

Had to get my date home before curfew and so only heard part of the opening song from Vanilla Fudge (who I really liked at the time) - no great loss as it turned out!

Paul Hamer's picture

I was at the Saturday nite show. I was 16 at the time. My friend had just received his drivers license so we drove down to the show. As I recall Vanilla Fudge did not play Saturday nite and Savoy Brown opened the show, with Tull on second and Zep headlining. It was probably the best live rock and roll show in Chicago history.

It was Jethro Tull's live debut in America and in talking with them years later the crowd's positive reaction to them really took them by surprise. I have talked with Kim Simmonds of Savoy Brown and Martin Barre of Jethro Tull and that nite has remained for them a career standout.

It was nite's like this at the Kinetic, that led my friends John Unger, Mike Gedney and I to be three of the only 18,000 people who paid in advance to get into Woodstock later that same year.

Ed Gemkow's picture

Is there available a poster that would be for sale?

George Havelka's picture

You know, most of us went to see Vanilla Fudge, some knew of Tull, most hadn't heard of Zepplin. But after the first set, it was a whole new world. I'll never forget it. Vanilla who? Ian Anderson did his best lifting his one leg through most of his playing and they were really really good. But Zepplin made the earth move that night. Hard rock just got harder and Metal began. I still get chills thinking of the first time I heard Dazed and Confused. What a time. What a place. So happy to have been there. Cheers all!

grown up hippie's picture

I was at that show! A senior ina suburban Chicago high school my group of friends (all fabulous women) went and I still remember the show. I think my friend and I had just returned from an overnight trip to look at a college in downstate Illinois and we hadn't slept in two nights!

Name's picture

JUST FOUND TIS WEBSITE, VERY COOL !
I WAS AT THIS CONCERT, LED ZEP STOLE THE SHOW AS I REMEMBER

Bob's picture

I was at this concert both Friday & Saturday. It was the best overall concert at the Playground, and I was at about 20 of them.

It was mezmorizing. At least what I can remember of it.

Seeing Ian Anderson come out in his long trenchcoat and then own the crowd during Jethro Tull's first song has been a talking point of my favorite concerts to this day.

Seeing Page and Plant and Bonem for the first time... awestruck.

Bob Kerman
Co Owner
The Back Bar
Historic Rock Venue
Janesville, WI

http://www.thebackbar.com

karen lynch's picture

I will neverforget all of the great times I had at the playground. I can't believe it was so long ago. I just watched all most famous. It reminded me of quaaludes, great music and good times. I am happy I lived the life....

Jim Gouskos's picture

Aaron Russo is the one who gave me permission to use the name Kinetic Playground. He was a good friend and a very smart man. I just wanted to let you know that we opened with his full blessing. Great site by the way !!

-Jim Gouskos

LZ's picture

"Here comes Joe the Jammer," is what Robert Plant and Jimmy Page used to say when they saw Page's guitar tech Joe Wright coming their way.

Wright got his start playing rock 'n' roll at the legendary Windy City concert haunt The Kinetic Playground on Clark Street near Lawrence.

Wright organized the venue's Tuesday night jam sessions and owner Aaron Russo would let him in to see the concerts for free.

That's how he met Led Zeppelin backstage, before they played their first Chicago concert on Feb. 7, 1969, when they were booked as the opening act for Vanilla Fudge.

"No one had really heard of Led Zeppelin yet, but it featured Jimmy Page from the Yardbirds, and I was a big fan of the Yardbirds," Wright said.

right eventually signed on with the rising British rock group as a roadie and later became Page's guitar tech.

As his friendship with Page grew, Wright would often jam with him in his dressing room before a gig. Sometimes he was invited on stage, introduced by his new moniker "Joe Jammer."

Eventually, he went to England by Zep's manager, Peter Grant, who hooked the young American axe man up with renown British producer Mickey Most.

After forming The Joe Jammer Band, songs were recorded and he opened for Zeppelin, including the prestigious Festival Of Bath in June 1970.

Jammer later went on to play guitar for European singer Maggie Bell, the opening act on Bad Company's 1975 world tour.

Albums were made, tours were done, and Jammer did some elbow rubbing with major rock stars of the day, including Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton.

After spending most of the 1980s in Canada, Wright returned to Chicago in the late 1990s and has been active in area clubs and recording studios. A few years ago, Jammer wrote a tribute to his favorite sports team, "The White Sox Victory Song."

Though Joe Jammer never attained the fame and fortune of many his early European cohorts, the decades of blood, sweat, tears and hard work he invested are woven into the fabric of every note he plays in his live performances.

A typical show these days finds Jammer with his guitar in hand, ripping through a blend of classic cover songs (many with great stories attached) and his own original songs.

Joe Jammer never became a household name, but his name and reputation is renown and respected in the Chicagoland music community.

Jammer is talented, entertaining, and full of great rock 'n' roll war stories from the road.

http://www.nwitimes.com/entertainment/music/article_6106d09b-e51f-5e04-8...

Bill A.'s picture

Can't believe that it has been 39 years and to this day still tell the story to anyone who would listen, usually conversations about Rock concerts,about a new band that had to be seen and heard. Led Zepplin is still my ALL TIME favorite band to this day. The Kinetic playground, Aragon ballroom, Vanilla Fudge, Rotary Connection, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winters?, and then along came this new band debuting for the first time in Chicago at the Kinetic playground (was not aware they had their first Album out then). I remember it was a day that the Kinetic playground introduced new bands at a reduced rate, $5.00! At age 17 it seemed like a lot of money! Yes, we all sat on the floor and yes, in those days, we were allowed to smoke our cigarettes...LOL..($5.00/pack at the Playground) and yes the other smokes were ever present.I remember seeing and hearing for the first time ever, someone taking Bow to Guitar(Page?) and then vocals by Plant! Double WOW! I was sitting left and center and was so close we could litterally reach out and almost touch them.Page and Plant. that Bow to Guitar was forever indelably burned into my memory..AND the rest, as they say, was history.

Hieronymus Murphy's picture

No offense, but you're confusing two different times LZ was at the Kinetic in early 1969.

The first time, the bill was Jethro Tull opening, LZ second, and Vanilla Fudge headlining. All played both nights.

A few months later, the bill was Savoy Brown opening, Jethro Tull second, and LZ headlining. All played both nights.

How do I know? I was at shows during both visits.

My fondest memory of the second visit was: I was very close to the (surprisingly low) stage and Robert Plant was singing and dancing around at the edge of the stage like a man possessed. He stumbled, and did an unintentional stage dive on top of 4-5 of us. We caught him, pushed him back upright, he didn't miss a beat, and after the song ended, he came back to where we were, shook our hands and thanked us.

christine johnson's picture

I guess I was at the first show I don't remember hearing of savoy brown till decades later and seeing them at a fair I do remember Vanilla Fudge They were one of my favs Zep, grassroots, VF, Cream, lighthouse were some of the first rock music I listened to plus strawberry alarm clock, kinks, janis,

sande wiedman's picture

i had the most amazing times at the playground!! best years of my life, and to my friend karen lynch, we partied our asses off at the playground!!!!!!!!

sande wiedman's picture

karen, please contact me via email, or i am also on facebook. i would love to hear from you. man, we had some badass times at the playground. the good ole days!!!!!!!

Patti Mough's picture

Mike, I was your date that night. I don't remember if I got home on time before curfew that is. How weird I should come upon this post. I remember that night and how lucky I was to have been able to attend that concert. Still talk about it now and then. Hope you get to see this post.

Patti Mough's picture

I remember that night very clearly. It was an amazing show. I came to see Led Zeppelin and was blown away. I became an instant fan of Jethro Tull. I had to leave before vanilla fudge came on because of curfew as I was only 16. Mike mccurdy, I was at the same concert as you were but was not to become your girlfriend for a few years. Funny you never know how you will run into people ....still wishing they would go on tour again.

Patti Mough's picture

I was there. MIKE...you were my first true love. Can't believe this. Don't know if u will ever see this though. Great night..great concert.

RLennyPincus's picture

I was a huge VF band.  I heard that the second act of the night was actually the New Yardbirds performing under a different name.  I hadn't heard LZ I yet. Jethro Tull was absolutely amazing.  I don't think I have ever been as impressed by an opener in my life.  The crowd loved them.  To me, LZ was not as impressive as Tull.  I thought the drum solo was interminable but I thought Page was amazing.  It was loud.  The show was long even by Kinetic Playground standards, and Vanilla Fudge seemed a bit post verbal (acid?) but they were great.  When I finally heard the first LZ album, I had trouble linking the music with what I had seen.  I didn't think the band I saw at the Kinetic coulld possibly have made such a great album.

What a great night.

Buster Durgom's picture

1st concert coming from Kenosha, 1st time seeing Led Zeppelin, 1st hit of acid, 18yo, Awesome, $5

bill robinson's picture

if they had dropped a bomb on us at this show every guitar player in chicago would have disappeared ! thats how much we all love page. 

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Memorabilia:

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Comments

Mike McCurdy and Zeppelin concert by Patti Mough (not verified)
zep 2-1968 show by bill robinson (not verified)
Chicago Concert by Buster Durgom (not verified)
the Led Zeppelin concert by Patti Mough (not verified)
the Led Zeppelin concert by Patti Mough (not verified)
I was a huge VF band.  I by RLennyPincus (not verified)
Zepplin Chicago by George Havelka (not verified)
I guess I was at the first by christine johnson (not verified)
"Joe the Jammer" by LZ (not verified)
karen contact me, please? by sande wiedman (not verified)
kinetic playground by sande wiedman (not verified)
Kinetic Playground 1969 by karen lynch (not verified)
Feb 9 1969 by grown up hippie (not verified)
Aaron Russo by Jim Gouskos (not verified)
Kinetic Show by Paul Hamer (not verified)
JUST FOUND TIS WEBSITE, VERY by Name (not verified)
Led Zepplin at the Kinetic Playground WOW! by Bill A. (not verified)
1st set by Mike McCurdy (not verified)
poster by Ed Gemkow (not verified)