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Richfield Coliseum - January 24, 1975

  • Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, The Wanton Song, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Black Dog, Communication Breakdown.
srapallo's picture
on September 22, 2007 - 4:56pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.6 (90 votes)
January 24, 1975
Richfield
OH
United States
us
Setlist: 

Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, The Wanton Song, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Black Dog, Communication Breakdown.

Note: 
'75 North American Tour Programme

Click here to view the North American '75 Tour Programme (flipbook)

Press Review: Zeppelin: Slow to Start, but Hot!

RICHFIELD - Led Zeppelin spent their first hour on stage at the Coliseum Friday night playing music that was howlingly loud, but soggy and spiritless.

It may have been the effects of guitarist Jimmy Page's intermittent slugs on a Jack Daniel's whisky bottle, or they might just have needed to get some adrenalin moving, but after that first hour the band caught fire and soared through the rest of the concert.

In their seven years together, the members of Led Zeppelin have perfected a raucous, straight-ahead form of rock and roll steeped in blues and heavy metal overtones.

THE HEAVIEST musical weight falls on the shoulders of Page, whose incomparable guitar work overshadowed the efforts of his three cohorts.
Rail-thin, with a frazzled mop of black hair, Page dominated the evening with solos and fills that alternately screamed in intricate anguish or roared through dense, monstrous chordings.

Strutting and stalking across the stage, he directed most of his intensity toward his Gibson, slung almost knee-level. Simply, he proved he is one of the premier rock guitarists.

Initially, a disappointment was vocalist Robert Plant who demonstrated his vocal pipes are almost shot from years of abused singing in the alto range. After an hour of rasping and shouting his way through several songs, though, Plant showed the audience he can still sing like a banshee.

DRUMMER John Bonham and bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones filled in the bottom of Zeppelin's sound. Bonham delivered a 15-minute version of the drum Solo, during which he abused his drum kit with sticks, palms and fists, all at a thundering volume. Jones demonstrated unexpected keyboard work with some neat, electric piano solos.

And, yes, they were loud. Pushing their music through a quadrophonic sound system that carries an estimated 8,000 watts, the band produced a sound that bypassed the ears, settling in the chest cavity and exploding into the cerebral cortex of a listener.

Their offerings from the yet unreleased album were greeted politely by crowd members, most of who roared in frenzied appreciation as they recognized the opening phrases of a familiar song.

IN QUICK succession, they blasted out their well-known numbers: "The Song Remains the Same," "How Many More Times,", "Whole Lotta Love" - gathering strength and momentum with each.

The last number of their prepared set was "Stairway to Heaven," a piece that has become almost a litany to rabid Zeppelin listeners. They shouted for it, then quietly sang the words with Plant. It began quietly, gently and gathered force through its 10 minutes until it peaked amid a din of bellowing listeners who had shot to their feet even before the song had ended.

The audience demanded and got two encores. And watching the dazed exhausted listeners leave the hall, it was obvious the band had succeeded. [By B.VON STERNBERG | Beacon Journal. Jan 1975]
 

Notes: 
'75 North American Tour Programme

Click here to view the North American '75 Tour Programme (flipbook)

Press Review: Zeppelin: Slow to Start, but Hot!

RICHFIELD - Led Zeppelin spent their first hour on stage at the Coliseum Friday night playing music that was howlingly loud, but soggy and spiritless. It may have been the effects of guitarist Jimmy Page's intermittent slugs on a Jack Daniel's whisky bottle, or they might just have needed to get some adrenalin moving, but after that first hour the band caught fire and soared through the rest of the concert.

In their seven years together, the members of Led Zeppelin have perfected a raucous, straight-ahead form of rock and roll steeped in blues and heavy metal overtones.

THE HEAVIEST musical weight falls on the shoulders of Page, whose incomparable guitar work overshadowed the efforts of his three cohorts. Rail-thin, with a frazzled mop of black hair, Page dominated the evening with solos and fills that alternately screamed in intricate anguish or roared through dense, monstrous chordings.

Strutting and stalking across the stage, he directed most of his intensity toward his Gibson, slung almost knee-level. Simply, he proved he is one of the premier rock guitarists. Initially, a disappointment was vocalist Robert Plant who demonstrated his vocal pipes are almost shot from years of abused singing in the alto range. After an hour of rasping and shouting his way through several songs, though, Plant showed the audience he can still sing like a banshee.

DRUMMER John Bonham and bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones filled in the bottom of Zeppelin's sound. Bonham delivered a 15-minute version of the drum Solo, during which he abused his drum kit with sticks, palms and fists, all at a thundering volume. Jones demonstrated unexpected keyboard work with some neat, electric piano solos.

And, yes, they were loud. Pushing their music through a quadrophonic sound system that carries an estimated 8,000 watts, the band produced a sound that bypassed the ears, settling in the chest cavity and exploding into the cerebral cortex of a listener.

Their offerings from the yet unreleased album were greeted politely by crowd members, most of who roared in frenzied appreciation as they recognized the opening phrases of a familiar song.

IN QUICK succession, they blasted out their well-known numbers: "The Song Remains the Same," "How Many More Times,", "Whole Lotta Love" - gathering strength and momentum with each.

The last number of their prepared set was "Stairway to Heaven," a piece that has become almost a litany to rabid Zeppelin listeners. They shouted for it, then quietly sang the words with Plant. It began quietly, gently and gathered force through its 10 minutes until it peaked amid a din of bellowing listeners who had shot to their feet even before the song had ended.

The audience demanded and got two encores. And watching the dazed exhausted listeners leave the hall, it was obvious the band had succeeded. [By B.VON STERNBERG | Beacon Journal. Jan 1975]


Press Review (2) High Energy Group Performs - Capacity Crowd Jams with Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin sold out the Coliseum in Richfield In a reported two days on a mail-order basis. For those fortunate enough to get tickets it was worth the price. This was especially apparent during the concert as the energy level was really high.

The English quartet waited until most of the estimated 21,000 fans were seated before coming out about 75 minutes late. They didn’t waste any time however as they quickly broke into “Rock and Roll” and set the mood for the evening.

A new song from the forthcoming “Physical Graffiti” album followed, and then quickly into “Over the Hills and Far Away.” The first two songs were ragged as the sound crew compensated for the crowd. Robert Plant’s voice sounded ragged as if it might give out but a little way into “Over the Hills” it smoothed out and everything became fine.

Another new song, a rocker the name of which I didn’t catch, and then a medley of “The Song Remains The Same” and “The Rain Song.” These two songs start the “Houses of the Holy” album and fit well together also in the context of the concert.

After the medley everything became, “A bit more loose,” as Plant put it. Although the show was run extremely well, with a minimum of onstage hassle, the musicians were clearly loose. Jimmy Page quenched his thirst frequently from a bottle of Jack Daniels, with Plant and John Bonham joining him.

Two new songs were next, identified as best as possible as, “Cashmere,” and “The Wanton One.” A forth song from, “Houses of the Holy”, was next as John Paul Jones laid down his bass and sat behind the Mellotron keyboard. The song, “No Quarter,” was highlighted by a solo by Jones, As the solo closed Bonham began drumming and the two worked together for a while before being joined by Plant and Page for the conclusion. Jones continued on keyboards as the band began another new song titled, “Trampling Underfoot(?).”

Then Plant began talking about the, “old music,” as the band made ready to play, “Moby Dick.” John Bonham provided the fireworks this time with a drum solo. Fine stereo effects accented the drummers efforts and towards the end Bonham threw away the sticks and played with his bare hands.
 
After, “Moby Dick” Plant continued talking about the “old music,” saying that the next song was one that until the preceeding concert they hadn’t played for five and a half years. Page picked up his violin bow and began stroking his Fender with the opening lines of, “How Many More Times.” On this second, “old song,” the crowd really came alive. Page and Plant responded with a guitar-voice duet and Page ripped the bow to shreds as he beat it against his guitar.

As Page traded the Fender for a twin neck six-twelve string, Plant talked about how the next song was the cumulation of what they had been trying to say for the past six and a half years. The stage darkened to deep blue and a gold spot glistened on Plant’s wild blond curls as, “Stairway to Heaven,” began. The crowd had been waiting and it wasn’t disappointed as the foursome did a very close rendition. As Plant sang the last word of the song a white spot was trained on a reflective, faceted, spinning silver ball and the entire hail was a mass of rotating white spots as the band left.

Applause and lighted matches brought Zepplin back for an encore of “Whole Lotta Love.” During this song they played bits and pieces from a lot of their songs. Then the band made their exit but were brought back by 21,000 shouting fans.

This second encore was a medley of, “Communication Breakdown,” and “Lemon Song.” Again snatches of other songs were thrown in so at least a few bars of everyone’s favorite were played.

Led Zeppelin has been together for six and a half years and the reason is obvious. There are four talented musicians who play together, not just on the same stage. No huge egos are seen and for all the “heavy metal,” hullabaloo surrounding the band at times it seemed as though Page’s guitar was not loud enough. If I was pressed to find a complaint it would be that Plant didn’t play harmonica, but in total I would have to say that Zeppelin played one of the most enjoyable, professional and, best of all, fun concerts I’ve ever attended. [P. Sandmann / Pulse / Jan. 1975]

 

Setlists: 

Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, The Wanton Song, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Black Dog, Communication Breakdown.

Comments

Steve A. Jones's picture

Led Zeppelin stayed the night at Swingo's Keg & Quarter and were billed $13,000 for damages.
Swingo's was a hotel well-known to touring musicians.

Larry Baumgartl's picture

I had just got out of the army and a freind of mine got us 4th row tickets to the show. It was awesome and the first time any of us heard Kasmir. I took a few pictures of the band playing and still have them. I just bought Mothership and The new Song Remains the Same DVD. It is fantastic I love it.

GARY BREZINA's picture

IT WAS TRULY AN AWESOME NIGHT OF MUSIC. WHEN WALKING OUT OF THE CONCERT IT LOOKED LIKE A WAR ZONE WITH ALL THE LOWER WINDOWS SMASHED OUT.

John Gabriel's picture

I was still in High School when we went to this show. It was one of the best concerts I ever saw. They were great. They also played In the Light. Robert said, we are going to play a few songs off our new Physical Graffitti album thats due for release in March. They started jamming the new songs and No Quarter was awesome live!
I went up to the restroom and there were rocks smashing through the windows. When I went back in the arena, the band was playing & the crowd was unaware that a riot was going on outside.
This is the show that screwed me up. lol Zeppelin is my favorite band and influenced going to hundreds of shows & concerts after that show.
I'm now a concert promoter & book shows & events.

Argenteum Astrum's picture

A very good show except for Robert, whose voice is severely damaged by the flu. Jimmy's broken finger doesn't hamper his playing much at all and Jones and Bonham are as good as ever. The Wanton Song is very different from the record and sounds great. Kashmir is very powerful and heavy and sounds very much like the album version. No Quarter has no piano solo, Jones stays on the organ and it is quite good. How Many More Times, was the centerpiece instead of Dazed And Confused until Jimmy's finger healed and it sounds quite different in 1975. The bow solo is intact and it is pretty good. The encores have Robert's voice basically gone although he does manage a few good screams.

Mark's picture

Talk about excitement! A group of us mailed in for our tickets. Since we could only get 4 tickets with each order, four of us each sent in an order. When the tickets arrived, we called the coliseum to see which group of tickets were the best seats. We ended up with excellent seats. The show was just awesome. I can still remember looking at Pages fingers with the binoculars and not believing how fast they were moving! And he supposedly had an injured finger! And it was great the way the house lights went off and wham they were there playing "Rock and Roll", one of my all time favorites! I also remember especially loving "Trampled Underfoot". I loved the record version and I was hoping that the live version, if they played it, would live up to my expectations. It exceeded all of my hopes. As a matter of fact the whole night exceeded my hopes. I can still remember thinking to myself every 5 minutes that "I can't believe that Led Zeppelin is right there in front of me"!!! The only bad thing about this show was that it ended. I had the post concert blues for 6 months at least.

Gary's picture

I remember going there about 3:00 pm in the afternoon and waiting in the parking lot I lived need Hinckley Oh so the coliseum was just down the road, I had floor seats and I can remember going in and they had all these folding chairs lined up all nice and neat. Then the show started all the folding chairs were pretty much pushed to the sides or where ever since a lot of people flooded the floor it was very cozie that's for sure. I had lost all the friends I had came with but that didn't matter I made a lot of new friends we were about 20 feet from the stage and during Whole Lotta Love I got nailed in the chest with a broken drum stick. It was a free-fall going on down there but man what a great time.

After the show was over walked out in the hallway and that place was destroyed the were some cops there they had K-9's and they were basically telling us to get the hell out of there I was so high and drunk I just walked as straight as I could and headed for the car picked up a couple drunk chicks and hit the road. I will never forget that concert it was one of the best shows I seen even if Plant's voice was off a little you could not tell from where I was at!!!

CATHY COOK's picture

JIMMY PAGE DOESN'T LIST THIS CONCERT ON HIS PAGE BUT I KNOW HE WAS THERE EXCELLANT SHOW AS USUAL!

r's picture

I was at this show. We got bored during "No Quarter" and decided to take a walk around the, then new, venue. We heard a series of "Whack! Whack! Whack!" sounds followed by the sound of crashing glass. An usher we'd seen just a few moments before came rushing toward us, his face bloodied, shouting for us to "Get back inside!" As he shouted at us rocks and chunks of concrete started breaking through the large, plate-glass windows that made up the outside surface of the building. When we left later there were millions of shards of glass throughout the concourse and just about every window (they were about 3.5' sq) from the ground to about twenty-five up was broken. It made it quite cold in there. Contrary to the news article shown, the show had been sold out and apparently OVERSOLD for quite awhile and as I recall the people who were angry allegedly had legitimate tickets in hand but were refused entry by the fire marshall. The story at the time said that venue officials tried to get police from throughout the vicinity to help quell the violence but were refused because the locals didn't want the new arena there anyway. In all likelihood however the Richfield Coliseum, located in the countryside about halfway between Cleveland and Akron, was simply too far for any police to reach effectively.

Steve's picture

Got shut out on the mail order tickets, was working on my car that afternoon. A friend, who's uncle was the music editor of the Cleveland Press, called and said he had tickets if I could get him there. I put things back together, headed to his house, picked him up and went to the Coliseum. We went to Will Call and got the tickets. Turned out they were third row, dead center. Couldn't believe it! All I wanted to see/hear was the break/guitar lead after all the "stuff" in Whole Lotta Love, and was I disappointed. Jimmy Page had a couple of issues - the first being the broken finger from the subway in London. The second being Jack Daniels Black Label. He couldn't play probably one of the greatest leads in all of rock-n-roll history. Not only was he a half-step down on the neck (which sounded awful), but he was finger tied. Overall, the concert was great, mostly from a historical sense. Kashmir was tremendous, but it went on forever. The show had a big lull in the middle, but picked up with Moby Dick... I'm happy to say I got to see them before Bonzo left this world.

birdoffire's picture

Hello Larry,
if you took photos of this show, would you maybe somehow digitalize them and put them on the web? You could post them on a Zep fan forum or send them to the webmaster of this site, so he can add them right here to this concert's entry!
There are enough fans who are glad about every photo that surfaces, exspecially of a show we have no other photos from!
birdoffire

r's picture

Indeed please get 'em scanned if you can and send them along.

I recall Plant's voice was very hoarse and Page had broken a finger or two in a train door so his playing was likewise not up to snuff. I also remember them sharing a HALF GALLON jug of what appeared to be Jack Daniels whiskey. The bottle had a handle on the neck so Plant could hold it with a thumb and fingers, rested on his shoulder, like a hillbilly with a moonshine jug. Moreover I recall the more of that he swilled the better his voice got.

We were towards the back and the sound was wretched.

Kelley's picture

First, this was at a location no one had seen a concert at before. We drove in from Toldeo, and were lost for a while, along with a lot of other folks. The seats and carpeting(!) were all new, as were the blazers on all the ushers/security, who spent most of the concert trying to keep everyone from smoking, whether dope or just cigarettes. The concert was a little slow at first but kicked in after a few numbers (music, not doobs.) First time I'd ever seen an electric drum set in full replacement of skins. Hall stayed clear, and pretty cool (temp-wise) all night, even with all the smoking. (The security just gave up.) We found out why so cold on our way out. Pickup truck through a window next to the doors we'd come in through. I remember it as glass block, but I could be wrong. Seem to recall that was the last concert there for quite a while. I left Ohio the following year.

Brian Cole's picture

I was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio back in the 1960's. My 1st rock concert was Paul McCartney at age 13 in 1973.  My 2nd rock concert was this Led Zeppelin show. At that point in my life, I just figured ALL rock concerts were this awesome and mind blowing!

Bubbie Silverback's picture

Came alive at Kashmir. 

Never missed a show.  Musicarnival 1969 was my first.  Die hard fan but... First hour was torture!!  Once they found their groove the show was pure ZEP joy.  Sometimes they made you wait

 

 

Memorabilia:

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Comments

Came alive at Kashmir.  by Bubbie Silverback (not verified)
Aren't ALL Rock Concerts This Good? by Brian Cole (not verified)
75 CONCERT AT THE COLISUEM by GARY BREZINA (not verified)
JIMMY PAGE DOESN'T LIST THIS by CATHY COOK (not verified)
Great Show by John Gabriel (not verified)
First (and only) Zeppelin Concert by Steve (not verified)
My first Zeppelin concert! by Mark (not verified)
Carnage Continued at the Hotel! by Steve A. Jones (not verified)
Indeed please get 'em by r (not verified)
I was at this show... by r (not verified)
your photos by birdoffire (not verified)
January 1974 Cleveland Concert by Larry Baumgartl (not verified)