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Sports Arena - June 19, 1977

  • The Song Remains The Same, (The Rover intro) Sick Again, Nobody's Fault But Mine, In My Time of Dying, Since I've Been Loving You, No Quarter, Ten Years Gone, Battle of Evermore, Going to California, Mystery Train, Black Country Woman, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Kashmir, Jimmy Page solo, Achilles Last Stand, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Rock and Roll.
srapallo's picture
on September 22, 2007 - 9:06pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.9 (381 votes)
June 19, 1977
San Diego
CA
United States
us
Setlist: 

The Song Remains The Same, (The Rover intro) Sick Again, Nobody's Fault But Mine, In My Time of Dying, Since I've Been Loving You, No Quarter, Ten Years Gone, Battle of Evermore, Going to California, Mystery Train, Black Country Woman, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Kashmir, Jimmy Page solo, Achilles Last Stand, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Rock and Roll.

Note: 
77 programme
 

Click here to view the USA '77 Tour Programme
(flipbook)

Press Review: Led Zeppelin Puts Extra Rock In Its Roll

An amber galaxy of match flames cast a dim glow over the crammed Sports Arena as Led Zeppelin took possession of the stage last night. It was a salute from 14,210 ecstatic fans, a sign of their affection and a symbol of their expectations of a superb rock show.

Then, as guitarist Jimmy Page bassist John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham thundered out the opening chords of The Song Remains the Same, golden-dressed singer Robert Plant threw back his head and grinned broadly, reveling in the crowd’s jubilant welcome and the power of the music. They were opening a concert that would last nearly three hours of wide-ranging often exhilarating, sometimes boring rock and three hours of vividly imaginative visual effects.

At its best, the show captured what is best about rock-n-roll, its power to stir the human juices and inspire feelings of joyous abandon. At other times though, particularly during the several extended, pointless solos indulged in by Page, it dragged and sagged and let its momentum wheeze to a halt.

Plant did much to keep the fire burning, however, strutting like a pouter pigeon about the stage in his shiny white trousers, his burgundy shirt-jacket, open to reveal his chest, his long shaggy hair tossing about like a tree caught in a hurricane. He sang rock and the blues passionately, freely and skillfully. By reaching further into his chest for his voice than he has in the past, he brought increased power to his performance.

Oddly, a high moment in the evening came during a quitter time when Plant and Page performed a blues duo, seated side by side in the middle of the stage,  Plant singing (for him) softly, Page strumming a right bluesy acoustic guitar. They opened the set with Mystery Train, Plant pointedly imitating the classic Elvis Presley version of the song.

But what made Led Zep special? Why was it that this group of Englishmen sold out the Sports Arena, indeed their entire tour, the first day tickets went on sale? Why them and not some other rock group?

Yes, they play louder than the rest but the explanation involves more than volume. Led Zeppelin puts on a better show. It presents the string-haired Page bent low over his guitar, glancing a violin bow off its strings, a green pyramid of laser light shining down on him from above, a red light bathing his lower body from below, smoke swirling all about. It has a sense of dramatic pacing, Page dancing rhythmically from the drum stand to the foot of the stage and back again during a brief lull, then signaling a thunderous resurgence.

It has Jones bathed in green and iridescent red light during a long Elton John-ish piano solo in No Quarter, the green laser swirling through the rafters. Led Zep blasts its audience with a multitude of explosions and storms of glaring white light. Then, Led Zeppelin encores, after a six-minute standing ovation with Whole Lotta Love and plays Rock & Roll at its stirring best. [S.D.U.|6/20/77]

Notes: 
77 programme
 

Click here to view the USA '77 Tour Programme
(flipbook)

Press Review: Led Zeppelin Puts Extra Rock In Its Roll

An amber galaxy of match flames cast a dim glow over the crammed Sports Arena as Led Zeppelin took possession of the stage last night. It was a salute from 14,210 ecstatic fans, a sign of their affection and a symbol of their expectations of a superb rock show.

Then, as guitarist Jimmy Page bassist John Paul Jones and drummer John Bonham thundered out the opening chords of The Song Remains the Same, golden-dressed singer Robert Plant threw back his head and grinned broadly, reveling in the crowd’s jubilant welcome and the power of the music. They were opening a concert that would last nearly three hours of wide-ranging often exhilarating, sometimes boring rock and three hours of vividly imaginative visual effects.

At its best, the show captured what is best about rock-n-roll, its power to stir the human juices and inspire feelings of joyous abandon. At other times though, particularly during the several extended, pointless solos indulged in by Page, it dragged and sagged and let its momentum wheeze to a halt.

Plant did much to keep the fire burning, however, strutting like a pouter pigeon about the stage in his shiny white trousers, his burgundy shirt-jacket, open to reveal his chest, his long shaggy hair tossing about like a tree caught in a hurricane. He sang rock and the blues passionately, freely and skillfully. By reaching further into his chest for his voice than he has in the past, he brought increased power to his performance.

Oddly, a high moment in the evening came during a quitter time when Plant and Page performed a blues duo, seated side by side in the middle of the stage,  Plant singing (for him) softly, Page strumming a right bluesy acoustic guitar. They opened the set with Mystery Train, Plant pointedly imitating the classic Elvis Presley version of the song.

But what made Led Zep special? Why was it that this group of Englishmen sold out the Sports Arena, indeed their entire tour, the first day tickets went on sale? Why them and not some other rock group?

Yes, they play louder than the rest but the explanation involves more than volume. Led Zeppelin puts on a better show. It presents the string-haired Page bent low over his guitar, glancing a violin bow off its strings, a green pyramid of laser light shining down on him from above, a red light bathing his lower body from below, smoke swirling all about. It has a sense of dramatic pacing, Page dancing rhythmically from the drum stand to the foot of the stage and back again during a brief lull, then signaling a thunderous resurgence.

It has Jones bathed in green and iridescent red light during a long Elton John-ish piano solo in No Quarter, the green laser swirling through the rafters. Led Zep blasts its audience with a multitude of explosions and storms of glaring white light. Then, Led Zeppelin encores, after a six-minute standing ovation with Whole Lotta Love and plays Rock & Roll at its stirring best. [S.D.U.|6/20/77]

Setlists: 

The Song Remains The Same, (The Rover intro) Sick Again, Nobody's Fault But Mine, In My Time of Dying, Since I've Been Loving You, No Quarter, Ten Years Gone, Battle of Evermore, Going to California, Mystery Train, Black Country Woman, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, White Summer ~ Black Mountainside, Kashmir, Jimmy Page solo, Achilles Last Stand, Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, Rock and Roll.

Comments

Tommy Rocks's picture

We had made a pact a year earlier when her mom secured tickets for us, that if she didn't make it to the concert, I was to go and she would meet me there. Phylis Jo Messer lost her battle with cancer just three days before the show. She was just 16. I was a wreck. I had lost my best friend, worst enemy and lover after watching her suffer thru chemo and Laitrill treatments. I kept my word......I took no one else to the show I was there alone......so I thought. All through the show I found myself looking at the empty seat beside me and yelling out "did you see that?" as if she was there with me......it wasn't till Dazed and Confused that I knew she was there. Jimmy was on the edge of the stage, a lazer pyramid appeared suddenly with Jimmy inside of it........I turned to shout out "did you see that?" and there she was smiling back at me.

Thank you Zep, thank you for that............

Ron's picture

I slept in the parking lot of the sports arena to get these tickets to celebrate my brothers' 21st birthday a week early. As it turned out, that show was postponed until June 19, the day before my 25th birthday. It was not a good thing that postponed the show but, I never had a birthday party like that one in ALL of my life. Maybe I'm predudice, or maybe it's just the excitement of BEING THERE but, I thought I witnessed a much better performance than was captured for "The Song Remains The Same".
Congrates on the latest show at the O2.
It's still true....Zeppelin Rules!!!

CBS's picture

http://www.cbs8.com/global/category.asp?c=155799&clipId=&topVideoCatNo=1...

Led Zep fans line-up for tickets.
January 31, 1977 - San Diego KFMBTV

Ray Schweighardt's picture

It appears that "Out On The Tiles/Moby Dick" (Over The Top) was dropped at this show because of Bonham's illness (alluded to at the 6-21 L.A. show). That alone makes this show a rarity.

Barbara's picture

It has been over 30 years and my ears are still ringing from the show! What a great time!

Bob's picture

Yeah, I was there too with my little brother. I bought the tix off someone who couldn't go. All I remember was the opening number "The Song Remains The Same" and then this chick sitting behind me screaming her lungs out the ENTIRE concert....I couldn't hear much after that =(. The tunes were awesome and I loved the green pyramid over JP as he played some solo and it spun around faster as he played. Smoke and all! At the end, some dude burned my arm with a lit joint and after the house lights had been up for like 15 mins, two dudes in front of us stoned out of their minds were yelling "Immigrant Song, Immigrant Song!!" completely unaware the show was over....quite a night for me.

John Britsas's picture

Had a row of tickets sold to friends,went for free,what a party!

Greg Gallo's picture

I've always considered this show a high point of my life. The acoustic set was smoking. And so was I!

Ken's picture

From what I remember we had an excellent time......... just the vibe before the concert was cool. San Diego was very "Hi" during the 70's.

Argenteum Astrum's picture

This show is wonderful. Jimmy Page is playing some of the best guitar I have ever heard, and despite his back problems during this show, Jonesy is amazing on bass and keyboards. Robert's voice is in very good shape, and the only problem comes from Bonham. He sounds fine sometimes, but other times, his fills are measures behind the rest of the group and his playing is erratic ... it still sounds fine with the songs and makes for some new arrangements, but sometimes he seems lost ... they drop Moby Dick because of this. ("He's got trouble with his back. He's been lying in bed all day. It's about time we had some sordid press. It should be noted that he doesn't just play backgammon!" Plant stated somewhere in the show.) Anyhow, this show is great, and No Quarter, Ten Years Gone and Achilles Last Stand rock! Jimmy is on; this is his show.

Mark Worthen's picture

I had seen Zeppelin in 1975 in San Diego at the age of 15 and was in heaven. I had been a fan since I was 12--my father bought the first album in 1969 and he continued buying them until I starting working and could buy albums myself (I had a cool Dad--he was an eye surgeon but had been a jazz drummer and thought Bonham and the whole band were awesome).

Anyway, 1977 - age 17 - My friend and I had camped out for the tickets. The concert date changed and it conflicted with a planned family vacation. But my parents let my sister and I stay home while they and the younger kids left for vacation in Arizona. They knew that seeing Zeppelin was like the most important thing in my life so it was actually my Dad who proposed that my sister and I drive to Arizona and join the rest of the family the day after the concert.

The concert was incredible; I managed to not get too stoned because I wanted to remember the show! I was singing and yelling and rocking and rolling through the whole show--as were my friends and everyone around us.

Three days after the show I was in Arizona, having joined the family on vacation. We went to what the locals called "sliding creek" because you could slide down on moss-covered rocks. It was fun and felt great in the Arizona heat ... until I slipped and hit my head. When I started getting dizzy and mumbling stuff that made no sense my parents called 911. In the ambulance driving from Flagstaff to Phoenix (Flagstaff didn't have a sophisticated enough neurology department apparently), I kept going in and out of consciousness.

My father, who was in the ambulance with me, told me later that I kept asking him, "I went to a Led Zeppelin concert didn't I? Oh I don't want to forget that ... I did go didn't I? ... I remember I was going to go but I can't remember going."

My Dad told me that here he was worrying I might have permanent brain damage or could die and I was totally worried about not being able to remember the Zeppelin show!

As it turned out the doctors gave me some drug that stopped my brain from swelling and I was alright. And best of all, I could remember the show! Well, I was glad to be alive too after I learned how dangerous it was but I remember being the happiest because I hadn't lost the memory of the best concert I ever attended.

Led Zeppelin is still my favorite band and I'm happy to see that younger generations continue to appreciate one of the best rock 'n roll bands of all time.

Dan McNew's picture

There are so many things I remember of this concert. I was a 19 year old sailor in the U.S. Navy and went to as many concerts as possible when my ship was in port. The original concert date was postponed from March to June. I remember a hippie selling shrooms as we waited outside for the doors to open. About an hour and a half later as we entered into the arena I saw the hippie passed out leaning against the glass with his sack of shrooms securely in his grasp. The show was unbelievable! It still ranks as one of the best concerts I have ever attended. The sound was great and they played all of my favorite tunes. At one point someone threw a string of firecrackers onto the stage. Robert Plant stopped the show and warned that if that happens again the show will be over. Needless to say everyone was on their best behavior after that. This is one of the few concerts that is still vivid in my mind. I can't believe it has been more than 32 years ago.

Sathington's picture

That quote was referring to JPJ, not Bonzo.

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