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Montreal Forum - June 7, 1972

  • Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Stairway to Heaven, Going to California, That's the Way, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Hello Mary Lou, Running Bear, Money Honey, Mess of Blues, Going Down Slow), Rock and Roll, Organ solo ~ Thank You.
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 5:23pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.5 (39 votes)
June 7, 1972
Montreal
QC
Canada
ca
Setlist: 

Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Stairway to Heaven, Going to California, That's the Way, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Hello Mary Lou, Running Bear, Money Honey, Mess of Blues, Going Down Slow), Rock and Roll, Organ solo ~ Thank You.

Note: 

Press review: Led Zeppelin: Top Heavies Electrify 12,000 at Forum

The members of Led Zeppelin are safely ensconced in their Waldorf-Astoria suite in New York this morning while the city of Montreal faces a severe power shortage as a result of the British group's gig here last night.

Zep couldn't have left too much amperage in town after they put on one of the most electric shows Montreal will ever see. And the 12.000 people in the Forum got quite a charge out of it.

It was the hard-line rockers' second stop on their latest North American tour. And, all along the Eastern seaboard, they'll be flying back the same night to stay in the Waldorf, their home away from home.

Well, Jimmy Page and crew earned their substantial pay last night. They played for well over two hours — there were no preliminary groups.

They are not only the original group of all the heavies, they are still the best. All their imitators — Black Sabbath, Grand Funk, etc. — aren't even in the money (figuratively speaking, of course).

Page can hold his own with just about any electric guitarist in the world. He has simply gotten better since his Yardbird days with Eric Clapton, and continues to grow.

When Page takes off on a riff, you listen. It's like taking your back brain out for a night on the town. There is so much electricity and sound coming through those speakers you almost think they're going to explode.
The group came out and ripped into their best-known songs, starting with The Immigrant Song. And, before the crescendo of requests grew too insistent, they did Stairway to Heaven, that venerable, reflective piece that everyone seems to get into. It’s their best work yet.

One small complaint — lead vocalist Robert Plant got a little lazy on the song, choosing the low route on the high notes, going an octave lower.
In fact, Plant is more of a shrieker than a singer, most of the time letting the group's echo chamber do his work for him, yet, he is an inseparable part of the band. Plant, by the way, tries to sing a lot of his songs like Janis Joplin might, and even the mannerisms are the same.
Then Zep did four or five acoustic songs, with John Paul Jones joining in on mandolin. They were valuable, but electric music is obviously Zep's forte.

On Black Dog, the best rocker in the past two years. Page launched into another riff, and cleared up one misconception of mine: on their latest album, in this cut, it sounds like Page falls off tempo. He did it again last night — but it's on purpose.

Seeing Page live gives you the opportunity to hear the great guitar runs that he is capable of; on Zep albums, the flashy stuff is sorely missing (listen to Whole Lotta Lovin', for example — Page is brilliant for 10 seconds, but that's all of a guitar break there is). Jimmy has more riffs in that expensive axe of his than anyone I've heard (with the possible exception of Johnny Winter).

I just hope he doesn't flash himself out by the time he reaches age 30.

Zep has learned to put strategic breaks in between the explosions of sound, a trick that makes their music so much more dynamic than that of their imitators. I'm glad too, we caught him early on the tour. His fingers must get mighty tired. My eyeballs got tired watching his fingers. But my ears were applauding. (B. Mann, Gazette, June 1972)

Notes: 

Press review: Led Zeppelin: Top Heavies Electrify 12,000 at Forum

The members of Led Zeppelin are safely ensconced in their Waldorf-Astoria suite in New York this morning while the city of Montreal faces a severe power shortage as a result of the British group's gig here last night.

Zep couldn't have left too much amperage in town after they put on one of the most electric shows Montreal will ever see. And the 12.000 people in the Forum got quite a charge out of it.

It was the hard-line rockers' second stop on their latest North American tour. And, all along the Eastern seaboard, they'll be flying back the same night to stay in the Waldorf, their home away from home.

Well, Jimmy Page and crew earned their substantial pay last night. They played for well over two hours — there were no preliminary groups.

They are not only the original group of all the heavies, they are still the best. All their imitators — Black Sabbath, Grand Funk, etc. — aren't even in the money (figuratively speaking, of course).

Page can hold his own with just about any electric guitarist in the world. He has simply gotten better since his Yardbird days with Eric Clapton, and continues to grow.

When Page takes off on a riff, you listen. It's like taking your back brain out for a night on the town. There is so much electricity and sound coming through those speakers you almost think they're going to explode.
The group came out and ripped into their best-known songs, starting with The Immigrant Song. And, before the crescendo of requests grew too insistent, they did Stairway to Heaven, that venerable, reflective piece that everyone seems to get into. It’s their best work yet.

One small complaint — lead vocalist Robert Plant got a little lazy on the song, choosing the low route on the high notes, going an octave lower.
In fact, Plant is more of a shrieker than a singer, most of the time letting the group's echo chamber do his work for him, yet, he is an inseparable part of the band. Plant, by the way, tries to sing a lot of his songs like Janis Joplin might, and even the mannerisms are the same.
Then Zep did four or five acoustic songs, with John Paul Jones joining in on mandolin. They were valuable, but electric music is obviously Zep's forte.

On Black Dog, the best rocker in the past two years. Page launched into another riff, and cleared up one misconception of mine: on their latest album, in this cut, it sounds like Page falls off tempo. He did it again last night — but it's on purpose.

Seeing Page live gives you the opportunity to hear the great guitar runs that he is capable of; on Zep albums, the flashy stuff is sorely missing (listen to Whole Lotta Lovin', for example — Page is brilliant for 10 seconds, but that's all of a guitar break there is). Jimmy has more riffs in that expensive axe of his than anyone I've heard (with the possible exception of Johnny Winter).

I just hope he doesn't flash himself out by the time he reaches age 30.

Zep has learned to put strategic breaks in between the explosions of sound, a trick that makes their music so much more dynamic than that of their imitators. I'm glad too, we caught him early on the tour. His fingers must get mighty tired. My eyeballs got tired watching his fingers. But my ears were applauding. (B. Mann, Gazette, June 1972)

Setlists: 

Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Stairway to Heaven, Going to California, That's the Way, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Hello Mary Lou, Running Bear, Money Honey, Mess of Blues, Going Down Slow), Rock and Roll, Organ solo ~ Thank You.

Comments

Argenteum Astrum's picture

A very good, although somewhat low key gig, the second of the 1972 US Tour. The problems that plagued their previous American concerts are presented here as well. Plant said at the beginning of the show: "I can hear it. It really doesn't sound so good. Everywhere we go around the country, everybody wants somebody else to stand up or sit down and every time I say anything about one thing or the other, there's lots of chaos. So can you sit down?" . Jimmy is really fast and fluid and the band is excellent. Robert's voice seems a little damage but he still manages to hit most of his range and what he lacks in power he makes up for passion. The acoustic set is excellent and Dazed And Confused is one of the best 1972 versions. The long medley is amazing with some incredibly rare stuff being played that had never been done in a medley before or since and the newly surfaced encores rock hard, especially Rock And Roll.

Alain Thibault's picture

Well all I can say is that is was the best time of my life.The electricity at those shows was all over the city even weeks before. Waited since then to see em again and heard today the comeback?? YES YES YES Led Zep Fan 4 Ever. Fill up the Olympic Stadium with 80,000 guys.

Ron's picture

I was 15 at the time. I couldn't get the expensive $6.50 seats so I bought the $5.50 ones. That put my friend Xavier (both of St. Pius X High) and I up in the brown section opposite the stage and very high. I had never sat that far up in the forum since that show. Xavier used to do a air guitar act at school to "Black Dog" so he got to see the real deal. Despite our poor seats the show was fantastic. I had never read any reviews on the show till today on this site but I have always said that my first impression of Plant was Janis Joplin. She had only been deceased a couple of years at the time so it was a bit spooky. I remember loving the laid back acoustic set. It took a lot of nerve for the band to try that in those large venues. John Bonham 's drum solo was just incredible a vivid memory. At the back side of the stage stood a huge pipe organ so it was no surprise that "Thank you" would be in the set. I don't know if they dragged that thing from town to town or if they found one locally. After the show I remember really great vibes from the crowd as we poured out onto St. Catherine St. to enjoy the summer air.

Louis Cotte's picture

That was amazing. I was 14 years old when I was asked by a good friend of mine to come with him to this show. At that time I only knew a few songs. I remember dancing my first slow on Since I've been loving you. I was about thirteen at that time. What great song it was and still is. With this show I discovered a new world. Like many teenagers of that time, I started learning to play the guitar with the song Stearway to Heaven. I've never quit playing even I knew I would never become as half good as Sir Page. Thank you for all the good memories that will last forever.

Denis's picture

J'avais 15 ans. J'y étais allé seul, mes amis ne voulaient pas venir (gang d'épais). J'avais payé mon billet 6$. Mon souvenir principal est le medley acoustique qu'ils on fait, Robert, Jimmy et John Paul assis sur trois chaises. Une merveille.

Francis Lossignol's picture

Must be the most memorable show i've ever seen. Something that make the envy around me today.

Daniel Geneau's picture

I was 17 at the time, it was my first rock show. I went to the show with a school friend. Right from the subway station to the forum's door, there was a line up of pushers. We smoked a few joints. At one point, my friend panicked asking "Where are they?" In fact, he was simply looking in the opposite direction. When Jimmy took his double neck, he thought he had vision problem, seing double. Stone he was...

I am very glad I was there, and it was so cheap!

Daniel

Brenda 's picture

This was my first rock concert and I was only 14! My friend Martha and I were madly taken by the group and we had to see
them My father bought us the tickets at only $6.50 CDN. It was amazing. What I wouldn't give to see them once again!! although sadly without John Bonham.

Benoît Daviau's picture

My first rock concert I was sixteen, I will never forget ! Ben Daviau

Pierre Boileau 's picture

J'avais 24 ans quand je suis aller au forum voir Led Zeppelin avec mon frère Robert, j'ai adoré ce spectacle que de bons souvenirs de ce spectacle.MERVEILLEUX.

 

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Comments

Led Zeppelin spectacle 7 juin 1972 by Pierre Boileau (not verified)
Concert 7 juin 1972 by Benoît Daviau (not verified)
I was 15 at the time. I by Ron (not verified)
Premier concert Led Zep by Denis (not verified)
7th row by Francis Lossignol (not verified)
Mon premier concert rock by Louis Cotte (not verified)
I was 17 at the time, it was by Daniel Geneau (not verified)
70 & 72 concerts by Alain Thibault (not verified)
I was there! by Brenda (not verified)