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Seattle Center Coliseum - March 17, 1975

  • Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, Dazed and Confused (incl. Woodstock), Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love (incl. The Crunge), Black Dog.
srapallo's picture
on September 22, 2007 - 6:07pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.8 (78 votes)
March 17, 1975
Seattle
WA
United States
us
Setlist: 

Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, Dazed and Confused (incl. Woodstock), Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love (incl. The Crunge), Black Dog.

Note: 
'75 North American Tour Programme

Click here to view the North American '75 Tour Programme (flipbook)

Press Review: Led Zeppelin - Worth the Wait

The event Seattle rock ‘n’ rollers have been waiting for, for at least two years - and have been holding tickets since before Christmas - finally happened last night at the Seattle Center Coliseum.  And the Led Zeppelin didn't let their 15,000 fans down. For three solid hours the band churned out their heavy metal rock 'n' roll – a lot of it stunningly good, some of it plain tedious - and also provided the most spectacular show any rock group has ever done here.

Not only did they have an unbelievable sound system and more lights, explosions and smoke than any ten groups combined, they also had laser beams

During "Dazed and Con fused," when Jimmy Page was playing his guitar with a violin bow, creating eerie sounds,  three  beams shot across the Coliseum;  from the stage to the ceiling on the opposite side. The three solid streams of light, which looked like you could walk on them,  changed colors with the music. Absolutely fascinating.

But the big news of the night was that Page’s  left ring finger, the tip of  which was smashed in a railway car in England just before the start of the tour in January, was okay. He played "Dazed," which had been cut out of early• shows, and seemed in fine form.
So many bands have been said to be the most popular and so many tours have been called the biggest, it’s hard to know what to believe -  but I think Led Zep tops them all. Their six albums are all platinum (over a million units sold) and tickets for their concerts are at a high premium - did you notice all those ads in the Personals offering tickets for $25 to $50 each? The reason isn't hype (the band hasn't gotten much press and most of it has been negative) or hit singles (very few) but the fact that Led Zep is one damn good rock band.

Their first album is a classic and everyone, including the new "Physical Graffiti," has some great things on it. And they always give a good performance. Anyone who saw them at the Seattle Pop Festival in July of 1969 or their first show here at the Arena in December of 1968, or the shows in '70, '72 and '73 will attest to that.

The band hasn't changed all that much since then. The skinny scrawny Page has the same mass of black curly hair and attacks the guitar as savagely as ever. Robert Plant has a mass of  blond curly hair and was wearing his usual tight, low-slung jeans and open shirt.

There were some changes among the others, however John Paul Jones had a short, 1950-ish hair style and played more keyboards than bass. (with good results mostly, though the long, jazzy, classical-influenced solo on grand piano in "No Quarter" wasn't appreciated.)

Only John Bonham showed any signs of age. The drummer must have put on a good 30 pounds since he was here last in 1973 and his hair is getting gray. (All of them are over 30 now.) Plant is the focus of most of the attention on stage. He strutted and posed and used the microphone in a way that could only be called obscene. One became quite familiar with the lines on his stomach as the night wore on because he was constantly thrusting his pelvis to the audience while throwing back his head.

Plant used to have the finest scream in rock outside of Little Richard, but there wasn't much evidence of that last night. He still got his point across in the strongest terms, mind you, but his screams were amplified beyond recognition by the sound system.

The system did other tricks as well, like playing bass notes so low that they shook your insides. (Sen-surround, perhaps?) and adding echo to Plant's voice and Page's guitar.

The band played a lot from their new album, particularly in the first part of the show. The best of them, to me, was "Kashmir", a long, involved piece that often shifted in mood. Jones played a synthesizer that sounded like violins and Plant's voice was haunting.

One of the boring parts of the show was "Moby Dick," the drum solo. Parts of "Dazed and Confused" got pretty tedious, too, but a lot of it was great, as when Plant worked in a little of Joni Mitchell's "Woodstock" and when he and Page did their guitar and voice exchange.

Every tune in the concert was inordinately long, which is why it went on three hours. "Stairway to Heaven" never seemed to end, though it gave Page a chance to so some of his best solos.

The applause was excessive, too. They let the audience go on a good ten minutes before they came back for an encore, a medley of their heavier rock numbers, beginning with "Whole Lotta Love." Surprisingly. the band didn't look all that exhausted at the end of the three-hour marathon but most of the audience, especially those on the main floor who had to stand, did.

The Led Zeppelin return Friday night for another sold out show at the Coliseum. [-P Macdonald, Times 3-18-75]

---------------

Squeeze all the air out of a three-hour Led Zeppelin concert at the Coliseum and you might have an hour of music and visual effects worth your attention.

Nevertheless, a sellout crowd that broke four plate-glass doors and brought a two-feet-deep stack of counterfeit tickets gust to get into the place, sat spellbound, despite the fact that ushers and police relieved them of the equivalent of a green garbage dumpster full of booze.
Led Zeppelin's appeal might be explained by the fact that they're known in the trade as a "street band," meaning that their following precedes critical attention by about two years.

Credit for such audience appeal belongs in large part to the band's singer, Robert Plant. Plant's ability to sing and play with, rather than to, a crowd is rare in this business.

Several years ago, when it was the custom to have chairs at rock concerts, people at the rear of the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver, B.C., began chanting "Please sit down!" to those blocking their view. Plant picked up on the chant, the band improvised a song, and a perennial concert hassle was thus resolved.

Supporting Plant's howling vocal S were lead guitarist Jimmy Page, on Les Paul and double-necked 12-and-six-stringed guitars, John Paul Jones on bass guitar, mellotron, and piano, and John Bonham on drums.

The band introduced four songs from its new double album, titled "Physical Graffiti". These included "Sick Again," a rocker, "In My Time of Dying," a spooky tune called "Kashmir" and the album's new single "Trampled Underfoot"

A better chunk of the hour that makes LZ worth the price of admission was occupied by "Dazed and Confused," one of the band's earliest songs, and the rock classic "Stairway to Heaven."

In between these two was a medley rendition of "Woodstock" which featured Page playing his guitar with a violin bow and dynamic visual effects capped by three laser beams emanating from the stage and, terminating high above the opposite end of the Coliseum.

As the band went onto its encore, Plant remarked to the audience, "You were fantastic, so were we". (BY D. P. BOND, March 1975)
 

Notes: 
'75 North American Tour Programme

Click here to view the North American '75 Tour Programme (flipbook)

Press Review: Led Zeppelin - Worth the Wait

The event Seattle rock ‘n’ rollers have been waiting for, for at least two years - and have been holding tickets since before Christmas - finally happened last night at the Seattle Center Coliseum.  And the Led Zeppelin didn't let their 15,000 fans down. For three solid hours the band churned out their heavy metal rock 'n' roll – a lot of it stunningly good, some of it plain tedious - and also provided the most spectacular show any rock group has ever done here.

Not only did they have an unbelievable sound system and more lights, explosions and smoke than any ten groups combined, they also had laser beams

During "Dazed and Con fused," when Jimmy Page was playing his guitar with a violin bow, creating eerie sounds,  three  beams shot across the Coliseum;  from the stage to the ceiling on the opposite side. The three solid streams of light, which looked like you could walk on them,  changed colors with the music. Absolutely fascinating.

But the big news of the night was that Page’s  left ring finger, the tip of  which was smashed in a railway car in England just before the start of the tour in January, was okay. He played "Dazed," which had been cut out of early• shows, and seemed in fine form.
So many bands have been said to be the most popular and so many tours have been called the biggest, it’s hard to know what to believe -  but I think Led Zep tops them all. Their six albums are all platinum (over a million units sold) and tickets for their concerts are at a high premium - did you notice all those ads in the Personals offering tickets for $25 to $50 each? The reason isn't hype (the band hasn't gotten much press and most of it has been negative) or hit singles (very few) but the fact that Led Zep is one damn good rock band.

Their first album is a classic and everyone, including the new "Physical Graffiti," has some great things on it. And they always give a good performance. Anyone who saw them at the Seattle Pop Festival in July of 1969 or their first show here at the Arena in December of 1968, or the shows in '70, '72 and '73 will attest to that.

The band hasn't changed all that much since then. The skinny scrawny Page has the same mass of black curly hair and attacks the guitar as savagely as ever. Robert Plant has a mass of  blond curly hair and was wearing his usual tight, low-slung jeans and open shirt.

There were some changes among the others, however John Paul Jones had a short, 1950-ish hair style and played more keyboards than bass. (with good results mostly, though the long, jazzy, classical-influenced solo on grand piano in "No Quarter" wasn't appreciated.)

Only John Bonham showed any signs of age. The drummer must have put on a good 30 pounds since he was here last in 1973 and his hair is getting gray. (All of them are over 30 now.) Plant is the focus of most of the attention on stage. He strutted and posed and used the microphone in a way that could only be called obscene. One became quite familiar with the lines on his stomach as the night wore on because he was constantly thrusting his pelvis to the audience while throwing back his head.

Plant used to have the finest scream in rock outside of Little Richard, but there wasn't much evidence of that last night. He still got his point across in the strongest terms, mind you, but his screams were amplified beyond recognition by the sound system.

The system did other tricks as well, like playing bass notes so low that they shook your insides. (Sen-surround, perhaps?) and adding echo to Plant's voice and Page's guitar.

The band played a lot from their new album, particularly in the first part of the show. The best of them, to me, was "Kashmir", a long, involved piece that often shifted in mood. Jones played a synthesizer that sounded like violins and Plant's voice was haunting.

One of the boring parts of the show was "Moby Dick," the drum solo. Parts of "Dazed and Confused" got pretty tedious, too, but a lot of it was great, as when Plant worked in a little of Joni Mitchell's "Woodstock" and when he and Page did their guitar and voice exchange.

Every tune in the concert was inordinately long, which is why it went on three hours. "Stairway to Heaven" never seemed to end, though it gave Page a chance to so some of his best solos.

The applause was excessive, too. They let the audience go on a good ten minutes before they came back for an encore, a medley of their heavier rock numbers, beginning with "Whole Lotta Love." Surprisingly. the band didn't look all that exhausted at the end of the three-hour marathon but most of the audience, especially those on the main floor who had to stand, did.

The Led Zeppelin return Friday night for another sold out show at the Coliseum. [-P Macdonald, Times 3-18-75]

---------------

Squeeze all the air out of a three-hour Led Zeppelin concert at the Coliseum and you might have an hour of music and visual effects worth your attention.

Nevertheless, a sellout crowd that broke four plate-glass doors and brought a two-feet-deep stack of counterfeit tickets gust to get into the place, sat spellbound, despite the fact that ushers and police relieved them of the equivalent of a green garbage dumpster full of booze.
Led Zeppelin's appeal might be explained by the fact that they're known in the trade as a "street band," meaning that their following precedes critical attention by about two years.

Credit for such audience appeal belongs in large part to the band's singer, Robert Plant. Plant's ability to sing and play with, rather than to, a crowd is rare in this business.

Several years ago, when it was the custom to have chairs at rock concerts, people at the rear of the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver, B.C., began chanting "Please sit down!" to those blocking their view. Plant picked up on the chant, the band improvised a song, and a perennial concert hassle was thus resolved.

Supporting Plant's howling vocal S were lead guitarist Jimmy Page, on Les Paul and double-necked 12-and-six-stringed guitars, John Paul Jones on bass guitar, mellotron, and piano, and John Bonham on drums.

The band introduced four songs from its new double album, titled "Physical Graffiti". These included "Sick Again," a rocker, "In My Time of Dying," a spooky tune called "Kashmir" and the album's new single "Trampled Underfoot"

A better chunk of the hour that makes LZ worth the price of admission was occupied by "Dazed and Confused," one of the band's earliest songs, and the rock classic "Stairway to Heaven."

In between these two was a medley rendition of "Woodstock" which featured Page playing his guitar with a violin bow and dynamic visual effects capped by three laser beams emanating from the stage and, terminating high above the opposite end of the Coliseum.

As the band went onto its encore, Plant remarked to the audience, "You were fantastic, so were we". (BY D. P. BOND, March 1975)
 

Setlists: 

Rock and Roll, Sick Again, Over the Hills and Far Away, In My Time of Dying, The Song Remains the Same, Rain Song, Kashmir, No Quarter, Trampled Underfoot, Moby Dick, Dazed and Confused (incl. Woodstock), Stairway to Heaven, Whole Lotta Love (incl. The Crunge), Black Dog.

Comments

Ron Monteferrante's picture

I remember sitting up high and watching the floor fill up.
Some of the audience began to light off fireworks and firecrackers.

An announcer came out and urged those that were lighting off the fireworks to stop and that Led Zeppelin will be out in a few hours.

It hit me then that we were like 3 hours early for the show. We were so excited that we just got up that morning, went to the Kingdome and waited in line. It was the afternoon before they opened the doors.

Jay's picture

I seem to remember Robert Plant mentioning something like the Pacific Northwest was the birthplace of The Kingsmen...and Page blasting out the intro to "Louie Louie"....! anybody else remember something like that?

Jerry Martin's picture

This was also a incredable show i brought my high school friend Kevin who did know much about led zeppelin but after the show thats all he could talk about what a amazing show they put on.we were also up frount. i felt that the coliseum shows were just a little better than the king dome show only because you were up close and more personal with the band.I am still a huge Robert Plant fan and have followed him throuh out the years and he still rocks to this day some 30 years latter.

Courtney's picture

My two friends and I showed up first in line early in the AM. The Coliseum had two entrances that were opened at about 6 PM. By the time they were about to open all three of us had been pushed back from the doors, which were made of glass, and at times my feet did not touch the ground as the crowd violently pushed forward. All at once the glass shattered a few feet in front of us and several people fell through the doors. The police went nuts trying to stop the crowd but succeeded. All we could do is watch in shock as all the people poured in from the other entrance. By the time we got inside the floor was packed (none of this reserved seating crap as nowadays) so we ended up sitting on the opposite end of the venue from the stage but it turned out great because it sounded perfect. For some strange reason that concert we were smokeless but I am glad now as I can remember it very well. Unbelievable especially Dazed and Confused and the encore Whole Lotta Love. The rumor was Page had hurt his finger the night before and was playing with 3 fingers but no matter. What a showman in his black snake pants, vest and bottle of Jack Daniels Black Label. I wish I could do it all over again.

Norqski's picture

Ah the memories! A couple of vivid ones
- the green lasers during Kashmir
- Robert dedicating "Stairway" to Jimi Hendrix
- Robert introducing the band as they left the stage "John Paul Jones!" "John Bonham!" "Jimmy Page!" and then "and a red rose..." which he dropped of the stage as he turned and left. I've often wondered at the melee that occured trying to grab the rose....!

Argenteum Astrum's picture

A really superb show from the 1975 Tour. The sound is great and the playing is excellent. Robert is in decent voice and the band is on a roll! No Quarter and Dazed And Confused are some of the best versions ever, and he opening numbers are really powerful. The earlier shows on the tour like the New York shows were long, but the marathons were generally played at 1973 length (No Quarter never exceeding twenty minutes, Dazed never exceeding thirty). In the west coast shows Zeppelin expands the numbers to where a thirty minute No Quarter and a forty-minute Dazed And Confused are routine. More highlights include something happening onstage after Bonham's drum solo, which causes Plant to start singing lines from Max Bygraves' "You're A Pink Toothbrush". This song is nothing more than Plant singing what appears to be a commercial jingle. It has only 10 seconds but it's funny!

Christopher's picture

I was one of those kids that were there at the Seattle Coliseum that day on March 17th 1975. There was no order at all. Even though there was a small line that had been presented for ticketholders to funnel into, the crowd had grown well beyond anything that could have been expected.

 

People gathered around the International Fountain and more came. My friend Randy Manning and I had come from Bothell with the thought that even though the tickets had long sold out, we thought that maybe if we were just there, we might get in. What a thought. Little did we know how true that would be.

 

Pandemonium grew as the crowd pushed and shoved even further past what the meager entrance lines had thought sufficient to the organizers. Seattle PD were only on foot and they were scrambling to keep what they thought was sensible order. There were no horse mounted police like you might see now.

 

The crowd amassed around the east entrance of the Coliseum looking for ways in. It was more than what the police could have ever imagined. Then as the fever built, we were just south of the main entrance by a diagonally vertical upright, we could hear someone was screaming loudly in protest. My friend and I looking over to see what the commotion was all about as this kid, who was kicking about, was being booted out of a double door from inside the Coliseum. He yelled loudly that he had "paid good money for the ticket" and that "it wasn't a counterfeit ticket, you asxxxxx!" He was definitely not happy, as you would expect, he was being tossed out on his arse! You could see his friend inside watching with total frustration.

 

Then suddenly, one of the disgruntled friends, maybe that guys friend, or a friend of one of many others that had had their counterfeit tickets confiscated was watching from inside and at the right time... went to a double door that no one was paying any attention to, that we just happened to be right next to and pushed it open, screaming to let everyone in. My friend and I were sucked in like being in the middle of a hurricane! Like a blast, we shot into the Coliseum’s main walkway, past police that were trying to stop us. 

 

 

 

The surge of ticketless fans was just too much for them. I could feel the energy behind me. My friend told me he hit a cop right in the face. I could hear breaking glass behind us but had no time to look or be bothered by the scene; All I knew was that, in seconds, we were being sucked into the building, across the corridor, through the next set of doors and down a handful of steps to inside the arena, just right of the stage.  I remember landing a little off because of the rush and spraining my right ankle. It was all over before we knew it. But, it was all yet to begin. My friend found me. We looked around, looked at each other and said together, "Unbelievable! We are in!"

 

To this day, there are locks and chains on double-doors, police on horses and long lines to separate the crowds. But come to think of it, Led Zeppelin isn’t playing anywhere, so, the chances are all too few to play this out again.

 

Looking back now, some forty years later, this being the best concert I have ever seen, and I have seen a lot (including LedZep/Seattle Kingdome July 17th, 1977) there was no way you could have ever imagined that this could have happened this way. In retrospect, I would’ve certainly paid the $7.50 for the ticket, if we could have found one. They sold out in less than one hour. But taking a chance on pure teenage luck, we got more than anything that we could have ever imagined. 

 

For free, we came and saw the Hammer of the Gods, the mighty and eternal Led Zeppelin!

 

Marc's picture

Tickets were $9, most I'd ever paid for a concert but hey, Led Zeppelin! Drove don from Whidbey Island, got there not long before the show started, found 2 seats about in the middle. Glad I got to see them live with Bonzo! Outstanding show, 3 encores, Page was playing with a finger he'd slammed in a car door but no problem. 

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