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City Hall (Newcastle) - November 11, 1971

  • includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Rock and Roll, Stairway to Heaven, That's the Way, Going to California, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Celebration Day, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown.
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 3:46pm
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.9 (13 votes)
November 11, 1971
Newcastle
United Kingdom
uk
Setlist: 

includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Rock and Roll, Stairway to Heaven, That's the Way, Going to California, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Celebration Day, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown.

Note: 

Press Review: Zeppelin – Good, Bad or Indifferent?

The months of frustration and impatient waiting were over – Led Zeppelin were back at Newcastle City Hall last Thursday. And the group that has brought the rock back to rock and roll were, for me at least, awful.

A young audience cried for more after their two and a quarter hour performance. They got it to the tune of a lengthy encore.

They gave us “Immigration Song”, Heartbreaker, and Robert Plant immediately sank to rock bottom in my estimation. Maybe it was the hall, maybe it was the mike…

The tragedy of it all was this band can play and Plant can sing to rival any group in the world. They proved this with one track from the new LP – Stairway to Heaven.

But Alas, the euphoria was not to last. The mediocrity of the rest of the gig could easily be seen in the band’s performance of Celebration Day.

I tried desperately to think back to Zeppelin’s first mind-shattering explosion on the British music scene and to convince myself that it WAS the notorious City Hall acoustics that daunted Plant.

I’ve hardly mentioned Jimmy Page, you say? True enough he did some amazing things with that guitar. But only spasmodically.

This is the start of the great Zeppelin British tour. They should make sure they get a bigger hall and better presentation than a packed City Hall got last Thursday night. [-S. Bennett / Disc, Nov. 1971]

Notes: 

Press Review: Zeppelin – Good, Bad or Indifferent?

The months of frustration and impatient waiting were over – Led Zeppelin were back at Newcastle City Hall last Thursday. And the group that has brought the rock back to rock and roll were, for me at least, awful.

A young audience cried for more after their two and a quarter hour performance. They got it to the tune of a lengthy encore.

They gave us “Immigration Song”, Heartbreaker, and Robert Plant immediately sank to rock bottom in my estimation. Maybe it was the hall, maybe it was the mike…

The tragedy of it all was this band can play and Plant can sing to rival any group in the world. They proved this with one track from the new LP – Stairway to Heaven.

But Alas, the euphoria was not to last. The mediocrity of the rest of the gig could easily be seen in the band’s performance of Celebration Day.

I tried desperately to think back to Zeppelin’s first mind-shattering explosion on the British music scene and to convince myself that it WAS the notorious City Hall acoustics that daunted Plant.

I’ve hardly mentioned Jimmy Page, you say? True enough he did some amazing things with that guitar. But only spasmodically.

This is the start of the great Zeppelin British tour. They should make sure they get a bigger hall and better presentation than a packed City Hall got last Thursday night. [-S. Bennett / Disc, Nov. 1971]

Setlists: 

includes: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Black Dog, Since I've Been Loving You, Rock and Roll, Stairway to Heaven, That's the Way, Going to California, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Dazed and Confused, What Is and What Should Never Be, Celebration Day, Whole Lotta Love (medley), Communication Breakdown.

Comments

A Zeppelin Lover's picture

I was there that night and I would definitely say Bonzo did Moby Dick. I remember the bottles of Newcastle Brown by his drum kit. Had an everlasting impression on me - bought a JPP signature guitar eventually. Still loving it.

Ian Tindale's picture

15 years old and quewed all night with my brothers friend to get front row seats. You could have knocked me down with a feather when I actually had one in my hand after the box office opened.
Took several pics with dads Kodak, the best for me of my hero Bonzo winking when I stood up like a prat to take the picture during a lull in the set. Shook hands with Robert, Jimmy and John Paul. The experience has just never been bettered and still makes me smile after all these years.

Mark Taylor's picture

...I think they also played moby dick & bron-y-aur stomp.

and I also think that they played battle of evermore, with sandy denny coming on as guest singer, but that might have been the 1972 show, almost exactly a year later.

Argenteum Astrum's picture

Really nice sound on this ... The band is playing very tight but loose, and are steamrolling through the set. Robert's voice is very good and the show focuses on the new material from the newly released 4th album. A great show. "Now then, today's the day of the Teddy Bear's picnic, and to go with it, the new album came out. I know what they say about the lenght of time between the two, and I'm sure you can rea all sorts of reports and toss a coin!" said Plant. The main question is Moby Dick really was played or not. Right after Celebration Day Plant saying "The one and only..." and the tape cuts straight into "You don't wanna be famous?" comment just before as Pagey starts with opening intro to Communication Breakdown.

Name's picture

There I was 16 years old. I had got up at some unearthly hour to queue for my ticket with my mate Rob and now here I was in the City Hall Newcastle, ready to rock. I seem to remember the house being very bright and then being suddenly plunged in to darkness and a spot light picking out Robert Plant who simply said: "Good evening" and then straight in to the pulsating beat of the Immigrant Song --- "A haa haaaaaa ha" and we were off, ear drums bleeding!

John Bonham was driving things along, John Paul Jones did his usual invisible man but supplied that incredible texture and Jimmy Page was, well, Jimmy Page. The way he played guitar I wouldn't be at all surprised if had sold his soul.

The evening before I was in the Five Bridges Hotel Gateshead, where they had a strict dress code ... not drinking alcohol, honest (only 16). I was standing at the bar next to this guy who was dressed head to toe in denim with cowboy boots and mane of hair. "Who the heck is that" I thought. Yup, it was Robert Plant. He nodded at me I nodded back and I rushed back to tell my girlfriend I'd just met Robert Plant! She turned round and of course he was gone. I've told that story many a time, like the time I met Ray Davies of the Kinks fame, in the Green Man in Finchley...but that's a tale for a different web site.

Name's picture

Led Zeppelin Newcastle City Hall 11th November 1971

For an old guy like me, who grew up listening to rock music in the late 60s and early 70s, Led Zeppelin were THE band. Their early albums are absolute classics of blues rock, and their live shows were simply the thing of legend. Everyone I knew had a copy of Led Zeppelin II, and would bring it to school to play at the record club, proudly displaying it to as a badge of honour. I’d so wanted to see Zeppelin live since I’d heard my friend’s older brothers talk about how great they were. They were lucky enough to see them at Newcastle City Hall and the Mayfair in the late 60s, and they came back from those gigs so excited, full of tales of Plant’s screaming vocals, of Page’s amazing guitar and how he “played his guitar with a violin bow”. In those days such tricks seemed almost unbelievable to a teenager like me.

So when Zeppelin toured in late 1971 it was my turn to see them for the first time. I was determined to make the most of the opportunity, and was lucky enough to end up seeing them twice in two days, on the first two nights of their UK tour, when they played in Newcastle and Sunderland. The concerts took place in the week that the classic Led Zeppelin IV album was released. Zeppelin were at the peak of their powers at this time, and were simply an awesome, electric live act.

I had a ticket for the Led Zeppelin concert at Sunderland on the Friday night, and just couldn’t wait! So I decided to try and see them at Newcastle the night before. The City Hall gig has been sold out for weeks, with people queuing all night for tickets; but I wasn’t going to let that stop me. I got home quickly after school on the Thursday night, had something to eat, and then set off on the train to Newcastle to try and blag a ticket outside of the venue. I managed to buy a ticket for a pretty ropey seat up in the circle, paying £1; which was twice the 50p face value. This may sound cheap now, but it seemed quite expensive at the time. But hey I was in, and although my view wasn’t great; I was going to see Led Zeppelin for the first time! I took my seat and waited for Zeppelin to take the stage. zepposter There was no support act; soon the lights went down and the guys stormed out, Robert Plant greeting us with a simple “Good evening! Here we are again”; and then it was straight into Immigrant Song, with Plant’s screaming wails roaring above Jimmy Page’s guitar. Page was wearing his guitar low, down around his knees, prowling around the stage while Prant posed, and played the rock god at the front. John Paul Jones stood quiet, and calm, providing the bass rhythms while John Bonham pounded and bashed away at his massive drum kit. For the next couple of hours I sat completely mesmerised by this band. I couldn’t take my eyes off Page and Plant. The set unfolded; featuring old favourites and tracks from the new lp.

There were so many highlights: the opening “Hey hey mama said the way you move, Gonna make you sweat, gonna make you groove” lines of Black Dog; the mystical beauty of Stairway to Heaven; the back to their roots rhythms of Rock and Roll; the exquisite blues guitar and blood-tingling vocals of Dazed and Confused; the acoustic guitar interlude for Thats the Way, Going to California and Tangerine. And Jimmy Page did play his guitar with a violin bow, and he has this strange aerial which he waved his hands at and, as if by magic, made weird spacey, spooky sounds (I later learned that this was called a theremin).

A crowd recording exists, on which you can apparently hear Robert Plant talking about the release of the new album: “Now then, today’s the day of the Teddy Bear’s picnic, and to go with it, the new album came out. I know what they say about the lenght of time between the two, and I’m sure you can read all sorts of reports and toss a coin!” The concert was quite long, over two hours, and LOUD (which was good; for me the louder the better), even up in the circle where I was sitting. Just perfection; the greatest rock’n'roll band in the world. I caught the late train, the music still ringing in my ears, still buzzing and knowing that I’d experienced something very special. I couldn’t wait to see them again the next night, and bored everyone at school with how great they were.

There seems to be a little debate as to the setlist that night. Most sites show the set as: Immigrant Song; Heartbreaker; Black Dog; Since I’ve Been Loving You; Rock and Roll; Stairway to Heaven; That’s the Way; Going to California; Tangerine; Dazed and Confused; What Is and What Should Never Be; Celebration Day; Whole Lotta Love. Encore: Communication Breakdown. However, I’ve also read that they played Moby Dick, but I am assured that this was not the case. They did however also play Bron-y-aur Stomp.

http://vintagerock.wordpress.com/

JOHN GILL's picture

I was there,  it was the year before I left school

Rob Pieroni's picture

I was 18 and still at school in Newcastle. The Hall was our regular venue for annual School Prize Day, explaining how I knew my way around the backstage warren. On the night we were amongst the first in and with no security on the inside stage doors we ventured forth. First person we came upon was Mr Plant towering above us and all smiles. He was gracious enough to autograph my Zep 2 & 3 albums but in truth I was totally tongue tied. A truly 'we are not worthy' moment that I can look back on all these years later with no small amount of embarrassment. All I can say now is "Thank You", it was an honour to have met. Yes, I still have the vinyl, the tour programme and the ticket....

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Comments

When I met Adonis.... by Rob Pieroni (not verified)
long time ago by JOHN GILL (not verified)
I was there... by Mark Taylor (not verified)
I was there that night and I by A Zeppelin Lover (not verified)
1971 - Newcastle City by Name (not verified)
1st Zep Concert by Ian Tindale (not verified)