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O'Keefe Centre - November 2, 1969

  • Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown (incl. Bluebird), I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You (incl. Ramble On (lyrics), What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, C'mon Everybody.
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 6:50am
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.8 (45 votes)
November 2, 1969
Toronto
ON
Canada
ca
Setlist: 

Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown (incl. Bluebird), I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You (incl. Ramble On (lyrics), What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, C'mon Everybody.

Note: 

2 shows: 5pm and 8:30pm

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book

While in Toronto, John Bonham picks up a miniature set of drums for his three year old son Jason: "I've bought him a great set of miniature drums. It's an absolutely perfect replica down to the bass drum pedal and hi-hat. Even I can play them. They are Japanese made and I saw them in a shop in Toronto. They weren't really for sale and were just on display. But I offered them a hundred dollars and bought them." (M.M., Dec. 1969)

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Press Reviews: The flight of the Led Zeppelin

"Everybody comfortable? 'cos we won't start until you are!"  Showmanship and artistry marked the Led Zeppelin concert at the O'Keefe Centre on Sunday. The surroundings weren't exactly the best for the creation of a relaxed, involved, groovy  audience - but the heavy music in the darkness slowly loosened the crowd and relaxed the people, but never to that point  of uninhibited hysteria that the Zeppelin seem to expect.

Rock is becoming an art - It became very obvious as the Zeppelin took the stage that rock music is now an art which, at peak performance, is experimenting with combinations of electronic sounds and voices. Rock is closest to achieving the function of pop art – in interpreting the industrial environment of machines - and motors to people.

But the Edward Bear, who are supposedly a new and fast-moving Canadian group first disgraced themselves with uncoordinated, loud and clumsy derivative noise. Don't bother about their first album which is to be dumped on the market soon.

Theatre is a large part of the success of a rock concert - the dance of singers and players, exhibiting slim and graceful bodies to the virile music, the element of surprise and old-fashioned carnival showmanship.

After a long and absorbing drum solo called 'Moby Dick' the Led Zeppelin wound up with the last, important component of good rock - audience reaction, as they moved us out of the theatre, still rocking and clapping our hands, the formal and straight atmosphere of the 0' Keefe blown to kingdom come. (by By J. ALBRIGHT, York University, Nov. 5, 1969)


Zeppelins Don't Bomb

At the O'Keefe Centre Sunday afternoon things seemed to be dying a slow and painful death until Led Zeppelin came on stage and took charge — singer Robert Plant wearing snakeskin boots, lead guitar Jimmy Page in shiny brown patent leather boots and shiny mauve pants that looked as though they were sewn right on him, bassist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham, all of them with flowing shoulder length hair. Plant s first comment was, "this is all very Establishment, isn't it", but it was obvious from the start that neither he nor the rest of the group was going to let it bother them.

They broke into "Communication Breakdown" — several thousand watts of music power, a gale of sound organized into thrusting bass lines, shattering chords and hypnotic rhythms and the audience forgot what a down O'- Keefe Centre was.

Jimmy Page was probably playing as well as he ever has, producing dazzling runs and dizzying slides of tremendous drive and force which his four sets of loudspeakers put across with soul-shaking intensity. Robert Plant's personality, expressed through his voice, is equally powerful. He doesn't sing lyrics as much as screams, yells, and moans of pure emotion. Together the two of them strut and dance around the stage, showing off like a pair of roosters.

Led Zeppelin's appeal is hard to pin down, and can really only be experienced live. At first the appeal seems to be based on sex, and the erotic does play an important part. But sex is there only because it is the only emotion basic enough and powerful enough to match the elemental passion of their music. This music is not complicated. It is in fact deliberately simplified in some aspects, using simple chord structures, and often very repetitive. Yet this is necessary to effectively convey its awesome and hypnotic power.

Led Zeppelin gets right to the heart of rock, and this is why their concert was so good. It's man's use of the unlimited power that machines have given him as an extension of his will, applied to music. There may be other groups more musical in a general way than Led Zeppelin, but none with a better understanding of the power of rock, and then they play live nothing, not even O'Keefe Centre, can get in their way. [U of T Varsity, Nov. 7, 1969 – by N. Schmidt]

Notes: 

2 shows: 5pm and 8:30pm

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book

While in Toronto, John Bonham picks up a miniature set of drums for his three year old son Jason: "I've bought him a great set of miniature drums. It's an absolutely perfect replica down to the bass drum pedal and hi-hat. Even I can play them. They are Japanese made and I saw them in a shop in Toronto. They weren't really for sale and were just on display. But I offered them a hundred dollars and bought them." (M.M., Dec. 1969)

-----------------

Press Reviews: The flight of the Led Zeppelin

"Everybody comfortable? 'cos we won't start until you are!"  Showmanship and artistry marked the Led Zeppelin concert at the O'Keefe Centre on Sunday. The surroundings weren't exactly the best for the creation of a relaxed, involved, groovy  audience - but the heavy music in the darkness slowly loosened the crowd and relaxed the people, but never to that point  of uninhibited hysteria that the Zeppelin seem to expect.

Rock is becoming an art - It became very obvious as the Zeppelin took the stage that rock music is now an art which, at peak performance, is experimenting with combinations of electronic sounds and voices. Rock is closest to achieving the function of pop art – in interpreting the industrial environment of machines - and motors to people.

But the Edward Bear, who are supposedly a new and fast-moving Canadian group first disgraced themselves with uncoordinated, loud and clumsy derivative noise. Don't bother about their first album which is to be dumped on the market soon.

Theatre is a large part of the success of a rock concert - the dance of singers and players, exhibiting slim and graceful bodies to the virile music, the element of surprise and old-fashioned carnival showmanship.

After a long and absorbing drum solo called 'Moby Dick' the Led Zeppelin wound up with the last, important component of good rock - audience reaction, as they moved us out of the theatre, still rocking and clapping our hands, the formal and straight atmosphere of the 0' Keefe blown to kingdom come. (by By J. ALBRIGHT, York University, Nov. 5, 1969)


Zeppelins Don't Bomb

At the O'Keefe Centre Sunday afternoon things seemed to be dying a slow and painful death until Led Zeppelin came on stage and took charge — singer Robert Plant wearing snakeskin boots, lead guitar Jimmy Page in shiny brown patent leather boots and shiny mauve pants that looked as though they were sewn right on him, bassist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham, all of them with flowing shoulder length hair. Plant s first comment was, "this is all very Establishment, isn't it", but it was obvious from the start that neither he nor the rest of the group was going to let it bother them.

They broke into "Communication Breakdown" — several thousand watts of music power, a gale of sound organized into thrusting bass lines, shattering chords and hypnotic rhythms and the audience forgot what a down O'- Keefe Centre was.

Jimmy Page was probably playing as well as he ever has, producing dazzling runs and dizzying slides of tremendous drive and force which his four sets of loudspeakers put across with soul-shaking intensity. Robert Plant's personality, expressed through his voice, is equally powerful. He doesn't sing lyrics as much as screams, yells, and moans of pure emotion. Together the two of them strut and dance around the stage, showing off like a pair of roosters.

Led Zeppelin's appeal is hard to pin down, and can really only be experienced live. At first the appeal seems to be based on sex, and the erotic does play an important part. But sex is there only because it is the only emotion basic enough and powerful enough to match the elemental passion of their music. This music is not complicated. It is in fact deliberately simplified in some aspects, using simple chord structures, and often very repetitive. Yet this is necessary to effectively convey its awesome and hypnotic power.

Led Zeppelin gets right to the heart of rock, and this is why their concert was so good. It's man's use of the unlimited power that machines have given him as an extension of his will, applied to music. There may be other groups more musical in a general way than Led Zeppelin, but none with a better understanding of the power of rock, and then they play live nothing, not even O'Keefe Centre, can get in their way. [U of T Varsity, Nov. 7, 1969 – by N. Schmidt]

Setlists: 

Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown (incl. Bluebird), I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You (incl. Ramble On (lyrics), What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, C'Mon Everybody.

Comments

rich's picture

this was the first full on rock concert i attended. my older brother was looking after me while my parents travelled. this was the only reason he took me.

i can honestly this was the most memory making event in my life. i'd been ruining my fingers on a kent-a-caster and i almost fainted when big brother told me.

the o'keef looked like freak show outside when we got there. at thirteen i just coudn't believe it.
what totally burned into my brain was when the opening bars rang out. i can still feel the buzz, i was totally immserd for the entire show.

Terry Armitage's picture

Concert-November 2nd 1969 I was 17 and me and a friend drove up from London Ontario in the middle
of winter in a volkswagen bug the floor was rotted out and there was no heat.
We finaly got to Toronto and went to the concert to say this concert changed my life is an understatement i was in a band and I knew music was going to be part of my life but after watching Jimmy on stage playing the way he did was dazzling.
Right there I made some life changing choices one was to go Back to England ( I Ieft there when I was 13)and persue a career in music which I did
.I now have been teaching guitar for about 28 years with many succeses( (one of my former students had a #1 video on much music at xmas)our mtv here in Canada and many other succeses see website.
Ironicly I was talking to one of my parents last night he has an 9 yearold daughter who played an acoustic crazy train which was put up on youtube now she has an electric guitar she can play all Stairway (except the lead) so we are going to put that up soon on you tube.
Thankyou Jimmy and the rest of Led zeppelin for all your incredible music over the years.
Rock on
Terry Armitage

P.G.Wodehouse's picture

November 2 1969 ....O'Keefe Centre...I was There!!! i'm sixty now...a woman i know emailed me with an MP3 attached...my gawd ...it was a Stairway to Heaven cover by ....Dolly Parton !!!!!!!!!!! argh!!!!!!!!when did she do this? did anyone approve it? it sooooooo sucked !!!!!! it should be eradicated somehow ...what i remember most about the show was there was a dude we sat behind in about the tenth row centre stage who raised and waved the Union Jack at the start of the show...it was huge...at least four by six feet...Robert Plant acknowledged it big time... and the other most memorable moment was when my girlfriend at the time leaned into my ear and yelled!... look at HIS cock!!!! [ rp's]...it's halfway down his leg ... ok we dropped acid that nite2...gawd thanks for changing my life LedZeppelin...

Dave Budge's picture

Just shy of my 15th birthday, my friend Gord Dahonick and I scored seats in row ZZ at O'Keefe Centre for this concert. Edward Bear was the opening act. That seems funny, but they were bluesy and good then. When Zeppelin started, the volume was overpowering, just short of painful, but the power of the music and the charisma of both Page and Plant was fantastic.

After a few minutes, we (and others) left our seats to crush closer to the stage. Wonderfully, the sound improved and the pain subsided. (It was later explained to me that the acoustics at O'Keefe, designed for opera and symphony, made it LOUDER at the back.) Plant was like an animal, constantly on the move, and Page seemed to be one with his Les Paul. We were astounded at the sound, the length of the solos (especially Dazed And Confused), the feeling that this was something entirely new. Magnificent. I've never stopped feeling lucky to have been there.

Argenteum Astrum's picture

An excellent show, full of energy and classic 1969 Zeppelin. Jones is all over the place, Jimmy is spectacular, Bonham is amazing and Robert's voice is so high it is unbelievable. Plant joked with the crowd: "We intend to try to do as much of the Led Zeppelin IV album as possible, but we through we'd cut it down by half and do Led Zeppelin II." There are many other songs thrown in, including a great version of Buffalo Springfield's Bluebird, Neil Young's Down By The River and The Yardbird's Still I'm Sad. This is all that is known to exist from this show, and it is truly a spectacular concert.

Bruce Friend's picture

Nov 2 1969 was a rainy nasty night , I had promise to take Lynda , my girl friend to see Led Zeppelin ( it will be our 44 Th ;wedding anniversary this year] We live at Dixie and Bloor In Mississauga . So with no tickets and just enough money to cover. we got her dad to drive us to the Islington Subway. Back then there was no off hour connection to the TTC. WE got there maybe 20 min before showtime , went to the ticket wicket and ask if there was any tickets.The girl ask if was kidding. the show had been sold out for a year. Standing in the lobby , thinking what a boob I was and Lyn was upset. This very pretty girl about our age came up to Lyn with a British accent ask her if she really wanted to see the Band. Turns out she was the girlfriend of one of the band members and was not feeling well. So we got tickets 6 rows back dead centre and to this day i have never know-en who was the band member or her name. I thank her for one the best memory ever

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Comments

The best of luck by Bruce Friend (not verified)
Zeppelin by Dave Budge (not verified)
to be 60 & remember the best of times by P.G.Wodehouse (not verified)
69 toronto concert by rich (not verified)