Skip directly to content

Kitchener Memorial Auditorium - November 4, 1969

  • includes: Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused,  How Many More Times, C'mon Everybody 
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 6:51am
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.5 (26 votes)
November 4, 1969
Kitchener
Canada
ca
Setlist: 

includes: Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused,  How Many More Times, C'mon Everybody
 

Note: 

8pm show, supported by The Copper Penny

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book

Press Reviews: Page Gives Led Zeppelin Rock Diamond Hardness

Jimmy Page is Led Zeppelin. He’s not just a part of the group along with the three other members, singer Robert Plant, drummer John Bonham and bass guitarist John Paul Jones. He’s it – the whole sound.

He gives Led Zeppelin’s rock its diamond hardness and his guitar splits through the heavy background and Plant’s frantic singing light from a facet of a 30-carat stone. The rest of the group, especially Robert Plant, provide a suitable setting for Page’s brilliance.

Led Zeppelin, called one of the top rock and roll groups in the world by some pop critics, played at the Kitchener Auditorium to more than 2,000 rock fans Tuesday night.

The show wasn’t all it could have been. The crowd was small, partly because of the Iron Butterfly concert at the University of Waterloo only last week and partly because of the stiff ticket prices, $4 and $5 and Led Zeppelin weren’t at their best.

“Tonight was a very short set,” Page said after the 45-minute show. “I didn’t do my set because of the amplifier blowing and the drummer didn’t do his set because he wasn’t feeling well.” Plant admitted that his voice was giving him problems too. Usually the group plays twice as long.

But the audience overlooked the show’s obvious faults and demanded more music when the group left the stage. They ran back, Plant tugging his t-shirt on again and gave one number, the strongest song of the evening. “They were a very good audience. I mean they were really with it at the end. You could see that,” Page said.

A large part  of the audience came from Toronto, Hamilton, London and places between. Most were university age.

They left Toronto this morning for another concert in the United States. In Toronto Sunday night, they packed the O’Keefe Centre for two shows. More than 6,000 people heard them there. This is their fourth North American tour. (J. Clemente / Kitchener Record / Nov.5, 1969)


Press Review: Zeppelin: Best rock concert ever

When Led Zeppelin hit the stage of the Kitchener Auditorium Tuesday night everyone present realized at once that this was not going to be just another concert. They were right; before the evening was over they had experienced and lived the Led Zeppelin group.

Ludicrous insanity I could best describe their performance. Jimmy Page running, jumping, straining getting unbelievable sounds and or noises on his guitar. From old blues riffs to distortion to feedback it all came off with finesse and wild beauty.

The lead singer Robert Plant is the ultimate extention of the school of lead singers started by Rolling Stone’s Mick Jaggar, including Jim Morrison and Iggy Stooge. Plant’s incredible voice range which goes from gutsy blues to high screams puts James Brown to shame.

Most of the time all you could see was his huge fuzzy ball of blonde hair shaking wildly and emitting unreal sounds. His body wriggling with every note of the music. Backing these two up were John Paul Jones laying down a perfect blues line and John Bonham on drums completing the rhythm section.

When the Led Zeppelin group do their songs they don’t just present a copy of their album cuts. They go all out, making them even more ludicrous and insane than the originals, adding parts of old blues or rock number.

One of the highlights of the concert was the group’s rendition of Dazed and Confused. In the middle of the number, Jimmy Page played his guitar with a bow just to add to the general insanity of the number.  

Unfortunately as with so many concerts, the big downfall was the inadequate acoustics, which somewhat marred the full value of Zeppelin’s extraordinary sound for the audience.

Also, the inevitable chore of sitting through the trite nonsense of the warm-up group was rather irritating. This time it was the Copper Penny, a local group of self proclaimed potential.

The Copper Penny tried to do all original material but came off sounding like a poor imitation of Guess Who. More often than not these warm up groups succeed in turning people off rather than warming them up.

Because of supposed technical difficulties which weren’t really apparent, the Zeppelin group left early. They also cut down somewhat from their usual act leaving out the drum solo and Page’s guitar solo Black Mountainside.

Only after repeated applause and cheers did Zeppelin return to do an encore which was an old Eddy Cochrane rock song.

Although the best rock ever to be held in this area, the Zeppelin group drew a very small crowd. Let’s hope the poor turnout won’t keep them from making a return trip. (D. Fisher, University of Waterloo news, Nov. 7, 1969)

 

Notes: 

8pm show, supported by The Copper Penny

'69 Programme Click here to view the 1969 Tour Book

Press Reviews: Page Gives Led Zeppelin Rock Diamond Hardness

Jimmy Page is Led Zeppelin. He’s not just a part of the group along with the three other members, singer Robert Plant, drummer John Bonham and bass guitarist John Paul Jones. He’s it – the whole sound.

He gives Led Zeppelin’s rock its diamond hardness and his guitar splits through the heavy background and Plant’s frantic singing light from a facet of a 30-carat stone. The rest of the group, especially Robert Plant, provide a suitable setting for Page’s brilliance.

Led Zeppelin, called one of the top rock and roll groups in the world by some pop critics, played at the Kitchener Auditorium to more than 2,000 rock fans Tuesday night.

The show wasn’t all it could have been. The crowd was small, partly because of the Iron Butterfly concert at the University of Waterloo only last week and partly because of the stiff ticket prices, $4 and $5 and Led Zeppelin weren’t at their best.

“Tonight was a very short set,” Page said after the 45-minute show. “I didn’t do my set because of the amplifier blowing and the drummer didn’t do his set because he wasn’t feeling well.” Plant admitted that his voice was giving him problems too. Usually the group plays twice as long.

But the audience overlooked the show’s obvious faults and demanded more music when the group left the stage. They ran back, Plant tugging his t-shirt on again and gave one number, the strongest song of the evening. “They were a very good audience. I mean they were really with it at the end. You could see that,” Page said.

A large part  of the audience came from Toronto, Hamilton, London and places between. Most were university age.

They left Toronto this morning for another concert in the United States. In Toronto Sunday night, they packed the O’Keefe Centre for two shows. More than 6,000 people heard them there. This is their fourth North American tour. (J. Clemente / Kitchener Record / Nov.5, 1969)


Press Review: Zeppelin: Best rock concert ever

When Led Zeppelin hit the stage of the Kitchener Auditorium Tuesday night everyone present realized at once that this was not going to be just another concert. They were right; before the evening was over they had experienced and lived the Led Zeppelin group.

Ludicrous insanity I could best describe their performance. Jimmy Page running, jumping, straining getting unbelievable sounds and or noises on his guitar. From old blues riffs to distortion to feedback it all came off with finesse and wild beauty.

The lead singer Robert Plant is the ultimate extention of the school of lead singers started by Rolling Stone’s Mick Jaggar, including Jim Morrison and Iggy Stooge. Plant’s incredible voice range which goes from gutsy blues to high screams puts James Brown to shame.

Most of the time all you could see was his huge fuzzy ball of blonde hair shaking wildly and emitting unreal sounds. His body wriggling with every note of the music. Backing these two up were John Paul Jones laying down a perfect blues line and John Bonham on drums completing the rhythm section.

When the Led Zeppelin group do their songs they don’t just present a copy of their album cuts. They go all out, making them even more ludicrous and insane than the originals, adding parts of old blues or rock number.

One of the highlights of the concert was the group’s rendition of Dazed and Confused. In the middle of the number, Jimmy Page played his guitar with a bow just to add to the general insanity of the number.  

Unfortunately as with so many concerts, the big downfall was the inadequate acoustics, which somewhat marred the full value of Zeppelin’s extraordinary sound for the audience.

Also, the inevitable chore of sitting through the trite nonsense of the warm-up group was rather irritating. This time it was the Copper Penny, a local group of self proclaimed potential.

The Copper Penny tried to do all original material but came off sounding like a poor imitation of Guess Who. More often than not these warm up groups succeed in turning people off rather than warming them up.

Because of supposed technical difficulties which weren’t really apparent, the Zeppelin group left early. They also cut down somewhat from their usual act leaving out the drum solo and Page’s guitar solo Black Mountainside.

Only after repeated applause and cheers did Zeppelin return to do an encore which was an old Eddy Cochrane rock song.

Although the best rock ever to be held in this area, the Zeppelin group drew a very small crowd. Let’s hope the poor turnout won’t keep them from making a return trip. (D. Fisher, University of Waterloo news, Nov. 7, 1969)

 

Setlists: 

includes: Good Times Bad Times (intro) ~ Communication Breakdown, I Can't Quit You Baby, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused,  How Many More Times, C'mon Everybody
 

Comments

Craig's picture

I must say I am thrilled to be able to leaf through the Led Zeppelin Site.
It is very very well done. The memories that flood back into my mind are priceless regarding this band and their incredible music.
Jimmy Page and his sound was the number one reason why I started teaching myself guitar. I eventually was able to learn most of the lead solo's and rhythm work and I was forever trying to find a sound that would make me feel good when I played. I did find that sound some 10 years later and my own style. I didn't want to be a Jimmy Page clone because there is only one Jimmy Page, but he certainly gave me a solid benchmark on where to start moving forward.
Jimmy was 10 ft tall on the stage and a fine gentleman in person. What an awesome site to see him play. Each member of that band was unique and will be forever known.
Thank you fine gentlemen for a job well done.

Dave Hell's picture

I was at this concert. My first. A 14 yr old from jr. high with a Jimmy Page wannabe complex. I remember having my first tokes and then restlessly enduring the seemingly endless Copper Penny set - which we thought of as too "AM" to be cool.

I remember Jimmy's reduced solos on GTBT and ComBreakDown piercing me like an aural laser...not bad for the small equipment set they played with that night.

I remember going home that night and looking at my harmony flat top, tiny Traynor Amp and Chet Atkin's guitar course level 3 exercises and thinking how fruitless it all was....had Jimmy put in his time with crappy guitars and ultra-square practice lessons, or is his technique a natural gift? Was the relentless practice a waste if you didn't have "the gift?"

I went on to see other LZ shows and through the years mastered my stubborn guitar (stubby fingers and all) I managed to work gigs with an assortment of bands...but life goes on and you never end up as the person you wished to be when you were a kid. I still play guitar as a hobby (Page ballads a specialty) and play for friends and family at get togethers...though I still can only dream of being as creative as Jimmy, He, LZ and this night will always retain a warm spot in my memories.

Wayne Cowan's picture

I was at this concert. We drove there from Hamilton in a Volkswagon Bug that had a gas heater. I was 19 years old at the time.

Mister D's picture

I believe this Zep concert was booked on rather short notice. They did put on a good show considering Bonham was ill with the flu or something, playing an hour set. It was a Tuesday night so the attendance was only 2000+ but many of the local bands/musicians came to see Zep and especially Jimmy Page. Copper Penny opened for Zep and did a 45 minute set of their soon to be released RCA Victor album. I talked to Page and Plant briefly as I was doing lighting for Copper Penny. The concert poster in the memorabilia was taken from the Auditorium box office after the gig. A guy from Revenue Canada showed up at the concert and demanded that Peter Grant pay a percentage of Zep’s fee before they could leave. Looking through the photos posted here there is one taken from side house left showing part of my old lighting system and really spooky is another taken side house right of me in standing against the boards(brown suede jacket) watching Zep do their set. There’s more to this story but that’s all I’m sayin’.

Bert Hamer's picture

I was the drummer for Copper Penny when we opened for L.Z. at the Kitchener Auditorium or the AULD as it is known. I was given praise for my Drum solo by the reporter of the Kitchener Record who wrote the critique of that concert; I still have the article w Page on the front.

I can still recall standing rite behind Bonham about eye level with his feet as I was behind the stage which was about 4 ft. high.Only half of the Aud was used, so the stage was across the middle of the arena.It had a high curtain behind it, hiding the other half of the arena. I was directly behind that curtain, which I parted just enough to watch Bonham do his thing, and also the others.

They were using our PA and Plant's mic started cutting out. There was a heckler in the crowd and he was taunting Robert when the mic cut out a few times. Plant adressed him saying something like " somebody here has a big mouth but I have the mic"! They were in the middle of a song near the end of the set when the mic cut out again. Plant was so infuriated that he slammed the mic down on the stage, stormed off to the side, ran down the stairs, where an old fat security guard was standing, yelled "get the fuck out of my way" and pushed him aside and ran into the hallway to the dressing room. The band finished the song and left the stage. I never saw them leave or talked w them.

Brandon's picture

.you guys rocked my small city of Kitchener/Waterloo Ontario, tomorrow is the anniversary and as tribute you should come play for us youngsters once again!

Gerry Collver's picture

I have been listening to the new Celebration Day and been amazed at how good the band sounds. I was at that 1969 Kitchener concert in the second row dead centre. I was a student at UofW at the time and can remember the concert being announced on pretty short notice. The second album was already out by this time I believe and I was really looking forward to seeing them. What I remember of the show was that seemed a bit uneven and I do remember the band leaving the stage like they seemed glad it was over. It was definitely the loudest concert to that point that I had ever attended and can recall my ears buzzing for hours after. At the end of the set, I seemed to recall the MC tried to coax the group back for an encore which I think they did but reluctantly.

Mister D's picture

Hey Bert, that's because they were in their dressing room after stage set-up and didn't want to talk much to anyone!
Page's amp head blew-up or something and he had to use Verne's.
I think Danny M. brought 2 of Hoople's JBL 4520's as an addition to the Copperpenny PA?
I bought one of Dave Richardson's photos a few years ago, a 16" x 20" black and white ... the one in the photo section with the four of them but with Plant facing towards Bonham.
You should come to my facebook wall, I've started posting Copperpenny/Kenny Hollis and other local area band promo photos and 45 rpm record scans.

Felipe's picture

Hello,

I'm a graduate Journalism student at Conestoga College and currently I'm in the research process for a short documentary about Zeppelin's visit to Kitchener and the Experience's return with Jason Bonham. I'd appreciate the chance to hear your story of that Tuesday afternoon. please let me know if you're interested, you can reach me at felipe(at)rockombia(dot)com

Many thanks!

Felipe

Warren's picture

 

Saw your post, and have some information that might help you out.

I saw Zep in Montreal/1975 but am spending some time up here in the KW

area.

If you want to contact me, send me an email and I can give you

a few extra stories, etc......leads whatever.

 

Wayne Schill's picture

In my grade 10 class my buddy and I befriended a new class mate from Montreal. One day in class he mentioned he had tickets to a concert he wanted us to go to. When I asked him who we were going to see he said Led Zeppelin. We had never heard of Led Zeppelin, but we went. When they came on stage and started into their performance IT BLEW MY MIND. Safe to say they changed my life. I now have the remastered albums and they are still blowing my mind. Unbelieveable!!!

Darryl Law's picture

Led Zeppelin In Kitchener 45 Years Ago – TODAY

/ (CJDV FM) Dave FM

Darryl Law

November 04, 2014 07:52 am

Today marks a landmark moment in rock for Kitchener. November 4th, 1969 – what would be one of the greatest rock bands of all time – Led Zeppelin played the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium.

 

 

If you were around then, you might’ve seen these posters around town…

I wonder if she still has that signed copy kicking around…it’d be worth a fortune.

Big thanks to Sam at LedZepplin.com for granting permission to use these images. Here’s an amazing place to check out more images, reviews, setlist and more..

And we’d be amiss if we didn’t mention the band who opened for Zeppelin…

Kitchener’s own Copper Penny – already a well established, popular Canadian band who’d performed with toured throughout the United States with headlining acts such as Led Zeppelin, Bob Seger, The Guess Who and Uriah Heep.

Probably their biggest  hit came a few years later…check it out

Happy anniversary!

DLaw

Post new comment

Plain text

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Refresh Type the characters you see in this picture. Type the characters you see in the picture; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.  Switch to audio verification.

Memorabilia:

[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list!","body":" Get exclusive\u00a0official\u00a0Led Zeppelin news and announcements. ","field_newsletter_id":"9697319","field_label_list_id":"5720","field_display_rates":"0","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"60000","field_toaster_position":"From Top","field_turnkey_height":"1000","field_mailing_list_params_toast":"&autoreply=no","field_mailing_list_params_se":"&autoreply=no"}}]

Comments

KW concert November 1969 by Wayne Schill (not verified)
Nov. 4 1969 by Warren (not verified)
I was at this concert. We by Wayne Cowan (not verified)
Led Zep in Kitchener 1969 by Gerry Collver (not verified)
Hey Bert, that's because by Mister D (not verified)
Kitchener concert by Bert Hamer (not verified)
Almost 50 years ago.. by Brandon (not verified)
I was at this concert. My by Dave Hell (not verified)
Kitchener - November 4, 1969 by Mister D (not verified)