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Madison Square Garden - September 19, 1970

  • Afternoon show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, For What It's Worth, Honey Bee), Communication BreakdownEvening Show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Dust My Broom, Bottle Up and Go, Lawdy Miss Clawdy, Some Other Guy, Train Kept a Rollin', I'm a King Bee, Baby Don't You Want To Go, C.C. Rider), Out On The Tiles, Communication Breakdown (incl. Gallows Pole), The Girl Can't help It (medley: incl. Talking About You, Twenty Flight Rock), How Many More Times (medley incl. Cadillac, Blueberry Hill).
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 11:46am
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.9 (317 votes)
September 19, 1970
New York
NY
United States
us
Setlist: 

Afternoon show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, For What It's Worth, Honey Bee), Communication Breakdown

Evening Show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Dust My Broom, Bottle Up and Go, Lawdy Miss Clawdy, Some Other Guy, Train Kept a Rollin', I'm a King Bee, Baby Don't You Want To Go, C.C. Rider), Out On The Tiles, Communication Breakdown (incl. Gallows Pole), The Girl Can't help It (medley: incl. Talking About You, Twenty Flight Rock), How Many More Times (medley incl. Cadillac, Blueberry Hill).

Note: 

The band return from England where they top the Melody Maker Poll Awards, dethroning the Beatles after eight years. A press conference is held the day before the show, with Jimmy Page and Robert Plant.

Originally slated for June 27th, the band turn down an offer of $200,000 and re-schedule the summer American tour, to appear at the Bath Festival.

Two shows are scheduled: 2pm & 8pm, where Robert Plant also pays tribute to Jimi Hendrix who had just died. The evening's performance is widely considered one of their best ever.

PRESS REVIEW: LED ZEP $200,000 U.S. SELLOUT GIG

Led Zeppelin finished their American tour with around 200,000 dollars worth of business at the big Madison Square Garden where they nearly filled the first concert and completely packed the second. They were the only act on the bill and so each member earned himself around 30,000 dollars (after deductions) for just under six hours work.

But work it was - second show received such audience reaction, comparable with the Stones at their Madison date, that several long encores were done by the group.

They introduced several things from die new Led Zeppelin Three album including one number with Jimmy Page on acoustic guitar and John Paul Jones on electric mandolin.

Backstage it was quiet, everybody looking forward to departing to England the following day. Paul Jones, ex-Manfred Mann, chatted to John Paul Jones. Paul Jones is in New York for the opening of his British hit play, 'Conduct Unbecoming'.

Robert Plant was talking about buying a horse for his wife he has one himself! — Noel Redding was a backstage visitor. Lord Sutch was around, attended the con cert, but apparently couldn't make it backstage. It isn't too matey right now between the Zep and his Lordship over the Sutch album. Apparently there was a misunderstanding, with the Zep thinking they were doing rock oldies with Sutch as a favour, but with Sutch adding new lyrics and different titles. [R.M., Oct. 1970 / Ian Dove]


PRESS REVIEW: With no fatigue showing following a gruelling six-week U.S. tour, Led Zeppelin filled the Garden for their second show. Saturday (19). With a good crowd for the first show, the group grossed over $200,000 and were the only act on the bill, unless you count disk jockey Scott Muni's minimal duties in introducing the group.

 

The second concert finished in just under three hours, with no sign of lagging enthusiasm from either audience or group. Drummer John Bonham walked off with the top ovation with his long feature, "Out on the Tiles" but the difference in the reaction to other members of the group was marginal.

The group flies off in several directions, covering the progressive and the rock world - "Blueberry Hill" yet, by Robert Plant. An undoubted assist is Plant's visual appeal which works on the assumption that a moving target is harder to hit.

This time round, the quartet featured a quiet time with Page doing an acoustic bit and a set with just Plant and John Paul Jones on electric mandolin. (J. RADCILIFFE, SEPT. 1970)

 

Notes: 

The band return from England where they top the Melody Maker Poll Awards, dethroning the Beatles after eight years. A press conference is held the day before the show, with Jimmy Page and Robert Plant.

Originally slated for June 27th, the band turn down an offer of $200,000 and re-schedule the summer American tour, to appear at the Bath Festival.

Two shows are scheduled: 2pm & 8pm, where Robert Plant also pays tribute to Jimi Hendrix who had just died. The evening's performance is widely considered one of their best ever.

PRESS REVIEW: LED ZEP $200,000 U.S. SELLOUT GIG

Led Zeppelin finished their American tour with around 200,000 dollars worth of business at the big Madison Square Garden where they nearly filled the first concert and completely packed the second. They were the only act on the bill and so each member earned himself around 30,000 dollars (after deductions) for just under six hours work.

But work it was - second show received such audience reaction, comparable with the Stones at their Madison date, that several long encores were done by the group.

They introduced several things from die new Led Zeppelin Three album including one number with Jimmy Page on acoustic guitar and John Paul Jones on electric mandolin.

Backstage it was quiet, everybody looking forward to departing to England the following day. Paul Jones, ex-Manfred Mann, chatted to John Paul Jones. Paul Jones is in New York for the opening of his British hit play, 'Conduct Unbecoming'.

Robert Plant was talking about buying a horse for his wife he has one himself! — Noel Redding was a backstage visitor. Lord Sutch was around, attended the con cert, but apparently couldn't make it backstage. It isn't too matey right now between the Zep and his Lordship over the Sutch album. Apparently there was a misunderstanding, with the Zep thinking they were doing rock oldies with Sutch as a favour, but with Sutch adding new lyrics and different titles. [R.M., Oct. 1970 / Ian Dove]


PRESS REVIEW (EVENING SHOW): LED ZEPPELIN: RHYTHM, HYPE & EVERYTHING RIGHT

NEW YORK - Led Zeppelin's records have, for the most part, turned -me off.  Admitting their general excellence as players, I was still unable to find little of lasting value in their slavish adherence to their by-now well-known psychedelic formula. Accordingly, I was prepared for a facile performance from the Zep at Madison Square Garden;  and expected to leave after half an hour. But Led Zeppelin blew the stuffings right out of my preconceived notions.

In brief, everything that has ever been right with live rock and roll is right with Led Zeppelin in concert. The first hour of their two and a half hour set consisted mostly of album cuts and single hits; here  Page, Plant, & Co. revealed an amazing ability to improvise meaningful and effective electronic sound, a pure,  unattached sort of creative flow that, I'm sure, left many of the Zep's teenybopper fans completely bewildered. Plant in particular astounded me with his free-noise vocal contributions.

After some slightly lackluster acoustic material and a John Bonham drum solo that brought down the packed house, the group got into the best extended live rock playing I have ever heard anyone do, and that includes the Stones. Plant would start the audience clapping on a beat, and the entire group would trust us, 30,000 pairs of hands, to keep the beat while they improvised against it. And it worked, time and time again, building a sense of ritual participation and pure gut-level joy while Led Zeppelin ripped through an improvised, seemingly eternal medley of old rock and blues songs. More heartfelt cries  for encores were never heard (though M.C. Scott Muni turned the calls for more into a cold ritual).

They finished with "Blueberry Hill" No fooling. Long live rock and roll!
[-Larry Hutchinson, ROCK, 11/70]


PRESS REVIEW: With no fatigue showing following a gruelling six-week U.S. tour, Led Zeppelin filled the Garden for their second show. Saturday (19). With a good crowd for the first show, the group grossed over $200,000 and were the only act on the bill, unless you count disk jockey Scott Muni's minimal duties in introducing the group.

The second concert finished in just under three hours, with no sign of lagging enthusiasm from either audience or group. Drummer John Bonham walked off with the top ovation with his long feature, "Out on the Tiles" but the difference in the reaction to other members of the group was marginal.

The group flies off in several directions, covering the progressive and the rock world - "Blueberry Hill" yet, by Robert Plant. An undoubted assist is Plant's visual appeal which works on the assumption that a moving target is harder to hit.

This time round, the quartet featured a quiet time with Page doing an acoustic bit and a set with just Plant and John Paul Jones on electric mandolin. (J. RADCILIFFE, SEPT. 1970)

 

Setlists: 

Afternoon show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, For What It's Worth, Honey Bee), Communication Breakdown.

Evening Show: Immigrant Song, Heartbreaker, Dazed and Confused, Bring It On Home, That's Way, Bron-Yr-Aur, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, Whole Lotta Love (medley incl. Let That Boy Boogie, Dust My Broom, Bottle Up and Go, Lawdy Miss Clawdy, Some Other Guy, Train Kept a Rollin', I'm a King Bee, Baby Don't You Want To Go, C.C. Rider), Out On The Tiles, Communication Breakdown (incl. Gallows Pole), The Girl Can't help It (medley: incl. Talking About You, Twenty Flight Rock), How Many More Times (medley incl. Cadillac, Blueberry Hill).

Comments

Paul ceasrine's picture

I was at both the 2:00 and 8:00 shows. At this time I was working at The Fillmore East, as an assistant stage manager. That weekend, The Grateful Dead were playing at the theatre. I worked their Friday night, and watched one of the most boring shows ever. I was scheduled to work the Saturday show, but lucked out when Concerts East (the promoters for the Zeppelin show at the Graden) sent 10 comp tickets to the Fillmore early Saturday morning. 5 for the early show and 5 for the evening show. Since I was one of the first ones to get to the Fillmore on Saturdays, guess who got the tickets.

Two co-workers and myself headed to the Garden around noon, the seats were on the first tier (loge area) just to the left of the stage. A perfect view of John Paul Jones and Bonhams footwork behind the monster bass drum.

Awesome show, can only remember 2 songs "Immigrant Song" as an opener, then "Heartbreaker" which was the best song played at the show. The first show was about 2/3 full (suprisingly not sold out) with about 12,000. Still not bad for an early Saturday matinee. What I can rememember is, the band was much more re-fined than earlier performances, and much louder.

I saw the band perform before at The Fillmore (opening for Iron Butterfly in early 69' and as a headliner later that year). The band now had a couple of staple songs to carry them through the longer sets. The only other band that could match Zeppelin in loudness was "Blue Cheer". After the first show ended, we headed to Club 82 for a few shots, then back to the Garden.

The evening show was even better. More songs and a longer show. Again "Heartbreaker" was the best song performed, and "Out on the Tiles" was played as an encore song. A packed house of 20,000 for the evening show. I remember calculating that about 32,000 fans saw Zeppelin perform that Saturday, with an average ticket price of $7. meaning Zeppelin took in $224,000 for one day I dreaded going back to the Fillmore, to get my $85 a night.

That night though was one of my best days, 1 to see Zeppelin and 2, not forced to hear The Grateful Dead. Paul C

J.Portanova's picture

IN THE GARDEN WITH LED

I saw and heard the Led Zeppelin band twice during I969, in that summer of Rock in-the-Park and Pavilion. I did not feel them in concert, though throughout the period of my initial exposure to Zeppelin, a vivid dichotomy between their studio orientated and concert-performed music threw shrouds of disappointment and confusion upon my eager anticipation of a live encounter with this premiere rock group of the recorded music medium.

Led Zeppelin has been my favorite album, without exception, for eighteen months running. In what may be termed the ultimate accomplishment in the realm of art, it has ceased to exist as an isolated, abstract form, dependent upon a specific point of departure or frame of reference for Its essential significance, to transcend the inherent limitations of its medium, becoming more than itself,
i.e. its own reason for being — truth and beauty, that which life imitates.

These identical four musicians, from England, Jimmy Page (guitar, electric and acoustic), Robert Plant (vocals, harmonica, and tambourine), John Bonham (drums and percussion), and John Paul Jones (bass, mandolin, and organ), provided those assembled at Madison Square Garden last Saturday (Sept. 19th) with a real unreal experience. Led Zeppelin have gone back to listen to their own albums; the absolute trip of those recordings was re-created in immense, smothering, immobilizing proportion, on September 19, 1970. Mark it, people.

We have become prostrate at the demands of the electrical monster, a ravenous beast reclaiming the greater part of a power man once harnessed against nature. In a careful ritual, we gather en masse to be lashed numb by the shock waves of the "amps." The sound system is the instrument of an intricate, exquisite, total intoxication of mind / soul / body in music. The genius and originality of man in the arena of entertainment has succeeded . . . "Auditorium" must now rank with the other enormously wicked, sensual lust-pleasures for which man has long envied our buried, crumbled, classical world.

Abruptly at 8:20 P.M., the sight hovered; and within minutes I stood, incredulous, as The Zeppelin descended upon the thousands in that definitive opening passage of bass notes and high, quivering shrieks . . . we, all, were consumed into the swirling maelstrom of "Dazed and Confused" . . . The World was Beatles once . . . we've passed that, to come to this — and whatever it remains, The Zeppelin are on the top. [“The RockWriter” / J. Portanova, Published Sept. 1970]

Al Sensu's picture

During my senior year of high school, I had a steady girlfriend who was a year behind me. She was gorgeous, with long black hair and a great figure. But when the school year ended, she gave me back my class ring and said she didn't want to go steady for the summer. I was crushed. We didn't see each other all summer, but stayed in touch. Back in the day, that meant by phone.

I lacked the confidence to approach girls at the beach or wherever, so there was no romantic action all summer. But nonetheless I had a good time, working as a messenger during the week, taking the bus to the beach on the weekend, hanging out with friends and smoking dope at night, listening to Hendrix, Cream, Led Zeppelin and Moby Grape alone in my room with headphones on.

During our year together, girlfriend and I had some nice makeout sessions, but anytime I tried to touch her breasts (and I definitely didn’t try touching certain other places), she gently pushed my hand away. I was so horny, I did anything I could to have (clothed) contact between my dick and her body. At seventeen, I was amazingly uninformed about sex; I just knew I had urges. I wasn’t even smart enough to figure out about masturbating, so consider how desperate I must have been! I actually orgasmed a couple of times during these sessions. I don’t remember the sensation, but just being aware that I had ejaculated and needed to do something about the sticky wetness in my pants.

In September of 1970, still seventeen, I started my freshman year of college. Now that I was a college man, my girlfriend was interested again. I was wary.

But Led Zeppelin was coming to town, so I bought tickets and on September 19, girlfriend and I went to Madison Square Garden. She wasn’t really a hard rock fan, but I think she found live Zep as mesmerizing as I did. As they launched into tunes from their second album such as Moby Dick and Whole Lotta Love, we launched into a serious makeout session.

I began caressing her breasts and she didn’t push my hand away. Was she really into it? Had her hormones kicked in? Or did she just think that she needed to “give” more now that I was in college? I’ll never know.

I slid my hand under her blouse and continued rubbing her tits over her bra. Eventually we returned our full attention to the music. It was a fantastic concert and included tunes from the third album, which was released the following month.

That was our last date. In November, I met a twenty-year-old college junior at a school event and all of a sudden, my sixteen-year-old girlfriend seemed very young. Before the year was out, I had made serious progress in my sexual education.

tony c.'s picture

most memorable,life changing concert I have ever experienced on so many levels! There was a spirit in the arena that night that was so beautiful between the crowd and the band.Plant`s voice was unbelievable,going beyond the studio versions all night long and after an afternoon show! I`m a singer/ guitarist-how does he do it? No wonder he developed a serious strain by 1973.Jimmy Page was brilliant,and passionate ,Bonham-the best of all time,Jonsey-solid,a musical monster! They had, and helped me find ,a love for playing that never left me.I`ll be 62 this year and I`m still gigging & loving it! I still keep the Rain Song alive !Thanks Led Zep for that night ,you were so good,so passionate,9/19/70 "Sermon on the mount"of all rock shows! You showed me what was possible musically with just 4 guys and a ton of talent and passion and I`ve spent my life chasing it. God bless Led Zeppelin! Tony C

Argenteum Astrum's picture

Afternoon show is a strong performance. Before What Is And What Should Never Be Plant paid tribute to Jimi Hendrix who died only one day earlier in Londo: "I think it's really hard ever having to say something about something that's quite a delicate point. But yesterday something happened - Jimi Hendrix died and we're all very sorry because he contributed a lot to the current music thing, and we'd like to just hope that everybody thinks it'a a real shame ... Jimi Hendrix!" Immigrant Song is playing with fury and led into very heavy version of Heartbreaker. Dazed And Confused follows that and it's another good version. A bit strange organ solo and dramatic Thank You making this show interesting and Bonham's high energic drum solo is very inspired. The Whole Lotta Love medley and agressive Communication Breakdown closed this show but it's nothing when compared to the evening set. This one is a great audience recording for this era of technology, and of Zep live, pleasure to listen to. The performance is definitely a best-of-1970, at outset seems to take a while to get going ... there are some crowd issues, Plant improvises a "sit down, sit down" lyric for the 1st verse of Dazed And Confused. Bring It On Home is really intense and from this point the band seems to have "won the audience over". Since I've Been Loving You has some unique ensemble improv and a great guitar solo. Jonesy is really stretching out in his organ solo, with what sounds like pitch-bending/shifting and the crowd seems to enjoy it. This show's utterly unique Whole Lotta Love does make it a strong "holy grail" candidate - it even briefly includes The Train Kept A Rollin’. Before as song starts, Plant says: “What we want to do is try to choose a good number to go on with.” Out On The Tiles is a raved-up "rhythm move along" version and the last time ver when they performed it live! Communication Breakdown includes Gallows Pole verses. Spontaneous Girl Can't Help It, Talking 'Bout You and Twenty Flight Rock encore medley is priceless and we're lucky to have it captured on tape. The band want to keep ensuring that their audience has a good time, so How Many More Times includes another excellent medley of odd tunes. What could we ask for more?

Vincent C's picture

Paul, Your brother Vin here, reading your recollection brings back great memories. Remember hanging with Janis in that rundown hotel in the Village. Hope all is well.

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