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Kiel Auditorium - April 11, 1970

  • includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.
srapallo's picture
on September 21, 2007 - 9:41am
Rate this show: 
Average: 4.6 (38 votes)
April 11, 1970
St. Louis
MO
United States
us
Setlist: 

includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.

Note: 

Press Review: Kiel Crowd Cheers British Rock Group

Full of sound and fury, Led Zeppelin played long and hard Saturday night and drew repeated standing ovations from a crowd of about 9,000 at Kiel Convention Hall.

The four-man British rock group played for more than two hours. Usually, a top-billed group spends a maximum of one hour on stage and leaves the rest of the time to secondary groups.

Led Zeppelin is dominated by the technical proficiency of Jimmy Page on guitar and the screaming vocals of Robert Plant. Most of their performance was concerned with individual exhibition rather than music.

Although there are flashes of fire that few other groups can duplicate, such as the heavy blues that had the crowd gyrating in front of the stage at the end, a Led Zeppelin concert overall is about as interesting musically as a long playing record of train whistles.

Much of their music goes in the direction of egoistic excess that makes so much of contemporary jazz essentially boring music. At one point in the concert, they even resorted to that hoary jazz trick of leaving the drummer onstage alone for a 15-minute solo.

The things Page can do with a guitar are astounding. He wrenches sound from the strings, picks up a bow and pulls incredible shriekings from them, drops the bow and still makes the guitar sound like a violin.
But his music like that that of the rest of the group, is a series of crescendos with no build-up, no sense of space. There is a long, creeping explosion, then a regrouping and another explosion. One longs for a BB King or an Eric Clapton to break through the mass of noise and play some music.

It was interesting to watch members of the audience try to dance to the Led Zeppelin.  Strong surging blues beat would come in, and there would be a delighted wiggling and scraping of feet. The dancers would keep going for a minute or so and look at each other with puzzlement. The beat had fled like a runaway child, to return at its own whim.

The sound in the convention hall, as usual, was miserable. Plant wore a pair of pretty high-heeled shows and several people threw flowers.

[H. Barnes | Post-Dispatch | 4.13.70]

Notes: 

Press Review: Kiel Crowd Cheers British Rock Group

Full of sound and fury, Led Zeppelin played long and hard Saturday night and drew repeated standing ovations from a crowd of about 9,000 at Kiel Convention Hall.

The four-man British rock group played for more than two hours. Usually, a top-billed group spends a maximum of one hour on stage and leaves the rest of the time to secondary groups. Led Zeppelin is dominated by the technical proficiency of Jimmy Page on guitar and the screaming vocals of Robert Plant. Most of their performance was concerned with individual exhibition rather than music.

Although there are flashes of fire that few other groups can duplicate, such as the heavy blues that had the crowd gyrating in front of the stage at the end, a Led Zeppelin concert overall is about as interesting musically as a long playing record of train whistles.

Much of their music goes in the direction of egoistic excess that makes so much of contemporary jazz essentially boring music. At one point in the concert, they even resorted to that hoary jazz trick of leaving the drummer onstage alone for a 15-minute solo.

The things Page can do with a guitar are astounding. He wrenches sound from the strings, picks up a bow and pulls incredible shriekings from them, drops the bow and still makes the guitar sound like a violin. But his music like that that of the rest of the group, is a series of crescendos with no build-up, no sense of space. There is a long, creeping explosion, then a regrouping and another explosion. One longs for a BB King or an Eric Clapton to break through the mass of noise and play some music.

It was interesting to watch members of the audience try to dance to the Led Zeppelin.  Strong surging blues beat would come in, and there would be a delighted wiggling and scraping of feet. The dancers would keep going for a minute or so and look at each other with puzzlement. The beat had fled like a runaway child, to return at its own whim.

The sound in the convention hall, as usual, was miserable. Plant wore a pair of pretty high-heeled shows and several people threw flowers.

[H. Barnes | Post-Dispatch | 4.13.70]

--------------------------------------------------------

Press Review (2): Zeppelin Receives Standing Ovation

Those of you who remember the overwhelming live performance of the now defunct Yardbirds will be ecstatic to learn that their vein of excitement is not forever gone and irrecoverable. Indeed, the last lead guitarist, Jimmy Page, is currently playing with a band called Led Zeppelin. During its concert at Kiel Auditorium April 11, the group employed many of the gimmicks that made the Yardbirds so popular, such as electronic effects, vibrant changes in dynamics and vocal-guitar interplay.

Although not unusually loud, Led Zeppelin’s performance was so “together” that the audience was quite engulfed in the force of the music. Bass guitarist John Paul Jones must be commended on his tasteful bass work – never too flashy, always complimenting the rest of the music, Jones also played Hammond organ, including a passable solo. John Bonham’s drum work fitted nicely with Led Zeppelin – never overly ostentatious, but interesting enough. Bonham’s live drum solo in Moby Dick was quite a bit more technically interesting than his performance on record, though was perhaps regrettable that he did not stray from a four-four rhythm.

Jimmy Page, of course, was his usual phenomenal self. Famous in musical circles for his extremely speedy guitar runs and licks, he demonstrated that his playing is not merely fast rambling, but a very logical sequence of well-valued notes. Accompanied by East-Indian-sounding drums, page’s solo, White Summer 9which was included on the Yardbirds last American album Little Games) was quite tasteful. But his unusual metabolic lifestyle somewhat got the better of him in spots, resulting in bursts of out-of-character runs. White Summer was especially delightful because of Page’s use of electronically amplified harmonics.

Even with these fine musicians, the flavor of the concert seemed to emanate from Robert Plant, the vocalist. Plant is not only a very fine singer but also an extremely dynamic performer. Rightfully proud of Led Zeppelin’s music, he became irritated at the vocal outbursts of frenzied fans (teenyboppers?) and advised them to “shut up… and dig music”.

The concert ended with a standing ovation from the near capacity crowd and an encore performance of Whole Lotta Love. Be sure and see Led Zeppelin at least once in your life. [By J. Witthaus/Ibis/April 1970]

Setlists: 

includes: We're Gonna Groove, Dazed and Confused, Heartbreaker, Bring It On Home, White Summer / Black Mountainside, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ solo / Thank You, What Is and What Should Never Be, Moby Dick, How Many More Times, Whole Lotta Love.

Comments

stevo's picture

My first concert when I was still in Jr High. Went with 3 friends and sat in balcony while the parents of one who drove when to see Alice's Restaraunt at a theater. No opening act. They were a little late, but opened with Immigrant Song. I think the next one was Heartbreaker, but can't be sure. I also remember Gallow's Pole (the "hangman" lyric stuck with me so I looked for it on the new record).
Plant introduced "Since I've Been Loving You" by saying, "You heard from Led Zeppelin 1 and Led Zeppelin 2, now we'll play you something from Led Zeppelin 3".

Other songs were Ramble On, What is and What Should Never Be, Bring it On Home, and I think Lemon Song or a variation of it. This was before groups traveled with lighting. They were bathed in purple stage lights entire night and spots except during the organ outro during "Thank You" when they turned bright red which drew "oooohs" from the crowd. Sound was great and not a huge system. Plant made comment about just getting off plane, so I think they may not have had a sound check. Played almost 3 hours with no breaks. Sounded just like the records.

Deborah Bounds Pena's picture

I remember this event so well!!! My girlfriend Susan and I were somehow thrust, lifted upon the stage by the rushing crowd. I was seventeen at the time, less than one month shy of my eighteenth birthday. I remember being there , dancing within feet and inches from Robert Plant (my favorite group at the time) I didnt' know what else to do so I just danced. ( as well as as I can remember, the whole concert) I don't remember that he opened his eyes at all. It seems He preferrred singing with eyes closed. It was okay with me because I was a rather shy 17 year old. I danced because it was a part of me. I remember exactly what I wore. (which is amazing since I'm 56 now and seventeen then). I wore low riding Levi's (bell bottoms) and a tight fitting shirt of grey, white and yellow (long sleeve), shirt (with no bra) and wide leather belt with buckle The whole thing was magic. We got off the stage because we were very tired. I remember meeting in the bathroom with Susan and neither of us could believe what we had experienced. Magic....Pure Magic....Love. Deborah.

Joe Re's picture

Although I was not there, I loved the stories y dad told me about led zeppelin! I listen to their music and hope to here more new songs by them! ZEPP LIVES FOREVER!

dennis's picture

My dad new a guy.... me and my keyboard player were back stage when they arrived. We were not, and continue to be "not worthy". 18 ay the time, now 60..... like it was yesterday.

Pete Sullivan's picture

I was nearing the end of my first year at college, and things looked bad for me with a lousy draft number and grades to match. You couldn't hang on to a student deferment with a "D" average.

Going to this concert was one of the best decisions I had made that year. Right now, I'm sorry but I can't really remember who I went with, or even how I got the ticket. They were good though. Center section, third or fourth row. Can't find the stub, but somehow I scored a poster. I don't really get Harper Barnes' review? It's like he went with expectations of something else. Some people I knew who were musicians at that time in St. Louis only regarded the Blues Masters as people entitled to play the blues. This was the evolution of Heavy soon to be Metal happening right in front of me.

I had not seen many pictures of the band and was amazed at the clothes and hair. Dark, tight, leather, lace, bangles, necklaces and BIG hair on Robert especially. Being close to the stage, I thought the sound was very good, especially when I could really get into John's solo. Never knew he did so much with his hands until I saw it. Lots of calling and answering between Jimi and Robert, but the whole show was huge and continuous.

John Paul Jones was the glue, but never really drew attention to himself like the other three. Did a lot of organ stuff which I know I should have expected but thought would be too hard to do on stage. The real stunner for me was when doing "Ramble On", they achieved live stereo with the PA. As I remember, they didn't have a lot of gear on stage but I could see a folding table on the side behind Jimi with a bunch of amps on it. I think this was part of the power behind the PA stacks that flanked the stage. Before this, most bands I had seen ran mostly vocals through the PA, but this show had miked everything and allowed the whole guitar thing to fly back and forth across the stage along with Robert's vocal. Heavy.

Wished I had scored some chemicals, but we did have some decent weed before the show. As Heavy Metal grew in the coming years, it kind of lost me because this show was printed in my head for how "Heavy" should be.

The brutal touring that was going on in those days did not deter this band from delivering a powerful and lengthy complete display of their virtuosity and showmanship. That's one thing that was becoming apparent to me at the time. British bands would always be something to watch as much as to hear.

Joe Re's picture

My dad had told me him and his buddy were going to go to a show here in the 80's but unfortunatley they cancelled that tour because Bonzo had died at that time and that made my dad get to the assumption that everything compared to Led Zeppelin after that sucked maybe he's right maybe he's wrong but I think he's right!
Also this around the time they started doing Achillies last stand, Hot Dog, Blueberry Hill, and White Summer/Black Mountain side live! So it would have been really cool. (Although really cool would be an understatement!)

deborah pena's picture

my girlfriend Susan and I danced on stage with them for 2 hours. Do you remember this? Pure magic.....Do you know where the video of this concert might be,,,,,,I would be pleased to show it to my grandchildren if I ever have any. It would be okay for myself, husband and children to see, relive this again.......Thank You. Deborah Pena
One of the purest, most magical moments, hours of my life.....read the St. Louis newspaper review......He said we looked at each other not knowing how to dance or what to do.....During the slow Blues songs we just danced more slowly. What else? Magnificent dancing next to Robert Plant for two hours, and Susan dancing near Bonham. This was truly one of the best experiences of my life. Hard to prove without the videos. If you know anything about these please email. I've been looking for this one for years.......Love and Peace Deborah Pena

Billy's picture

If you saw a show with Immigrant Song as 1st song and Heartbreaker as 2nd song then it was most likely later on in August of 1970 or the next year in 1971. Gallows Pole in the set? ... sounds like that would be from later in 1970 as a snippet or maybe in 1971.

Gary Holdinghausen's picture

I was there  - we had seats up along the rim of the auditorium . I couldn’t complain my friend paid for my ticket. I don’t remember a lot about the concert – I still have my ticket stub.

Mike Themig's picture

I was at the show with a friend.  When the lights went out..."cahboom" back then, it seemed everyone down on the floor lit up.  I said to my friend "What's that smell?"  He said "REEFER man....you ain't never smelled reefer?"  I remember the girls dancing on stage....they seemed a bit out of place but the music was awesome.  We were 19....so cool.

been there 's picture

i was there with my usaf buddies. scott afb.

zuris - schmid - me .

i got  antsy and we left the concert early giving our three ticket stubs to some  girls and told them to go in !!!

i think zeplin did not play loud enough to hear them good -  up in the cheap seats.

 

Doug  F.'s picture

   Had a school buddy who worked at a printers office in High School and he printed up several tickets we sold around school for $2.00 dollars a piece but the thing was you no way try to sit in that seat. They looked like the real deal-What happened was when Zepplin came out many on the floor standing around sort of rushed the stage and someone yelled out "if you all just Sit Down on the floor we could Stay where we were".  I sure wish I would of saved one of those fake tickets as everyone got in!

 

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